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The coldest winter : America and the Korean War / David Halberstam.

By: Halberstam, David.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Hyperion, [2007]Copyright date: ©2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: xi, 719 pages : maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781401300524; 1401300529; 9780786888627 (pbk.); 0786888628 (pbk.).Other title: America and the Korean War.Subject(s): Korean War, 1950-1953 -- United StatesDDC classification: 951.904/240973 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Glossary of military terms -- List of maps -- Note on military map symbols -- A warning at Unsan -- Bleak days: The In Min Gun drives south -- Washington goes to war -- The politics of two continents -- The last roll of the dice: the North Koreans push to Pusan -- MacArthur turns the tide: the Inchon landing -- Crossing the parallel and heading north -- The Chinese strike -- Learning to fight the Chinese: twin tunnels, Wonju, and Chipyongni -- The general and the president -- The consequences.
Summary: Pulitzer-winning historian Halberstam first decided to write this book more than thirty years ago and it took him nearly ten years. It stands as a lasting testament to its author, and to the fighting men whose heroism it chronicles. Halberstam gives us a full narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides, charting the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu, and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides vivid portraits of all the major figures--Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway. He also provides us with his trademark narrative journalism, chronicling the crucial battles with reportage of the highest order. At the heart of the book are the stories of the soldiers on the front lines who were left to deal with the consequences of the dangerous misjudgments and competing agendas of powerful men.--From publisher description.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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DS919 .H35 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001889674

Includes bibliographical references (pages 697-702) and index.

Glossary of military terms -- List of maps -- Note on military map symbols -- A warning at Unsan -- Bleak days: The In Min Gun drives south -- Washington goes to war -- The politics of two continents -- The last roll of the dice: the North Koreans push to Pusan -- MacArthur turns the tide: the Inchon landing -- Crossing the parallel and heading north -- The Chinese strike -- Learning to fight the Chinese: twin tunnels, Wonju, and Chipyongni -- The general and the president -- The consequences.

Pulitzer-winning historian Halberstam first decided to write this book more than thirty years ago and it took him nearly ten years. It stands as a lasting testament to its author, and to the fighting men whose heroism it chronicles. Halberstam gives us a full narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides, charting the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu, and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides vivid portraits of all the major figures--Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway. He also provides us with his trademark narrative journalism, chronicling the crucial battles with reportage of the highest order. At the heart of the book are the stories of the soldiers on the front lines who were left to deal with the consequences of the dangerous misjudgments and competing agendas of powerful men.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This final work by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author (The Best and the Brightest), who died in April, looks at the "Forgotten War." Not a battle history, it concentrates largely on the politics of the situation and how the Truman administration found itself fighting a war it did not want with a commander it could not trust. Much of the book concerns the MacArthur headquarters and the general's insistence on carrying out his own agenda rather than Washington's. The author expresses a great deal of anger at Col. Charles Willoughby, MacArthur's intelligence chief, who baldly falsified his estimates to agree with the boss's fanciful preconceptions of the Chinese. The result was a huge U.S. military debacle culminating in the disastrous retreat from the Yalu in 1951. Halberstam offers interesting discussions of the China Lobby and the effect it had on the debate. The run-up to the war and the first year are covered in great detail, but the book gets sketchier after Matthew Ridgway's assumption of supreme command in 1951. Some rough organization and lack of narrative covering the later years suggest that Halberstam's death may have cut short his work. Still, this is a vital, accessibly written resource for students of the period and is sure to be widely read. Recommended for most collections.-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David Halberstam was born on April 10, 1934 in New York City and later attended Harvard University. After graduating in 1955, Halberstam worked at a small daily newspaper until he attained a position at the Nashville Tennessean. <p> Halberstam has written over 20 books including The Children, a written account of his coverage of the Civil Rights Movement; The Best and Brightest, which was a bestseller; and The Game and October, 1964, both detailing his fascination of sports. Halberstam also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reports on the Vietnam War while working for the New York Times. He was killed in a car crash on April 23, 2007 at the age of 73. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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