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The slaves' war : the Civil War in the words of former slaves / Andrew Ward.

By: Ward, Andrew, 1946-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., 2008Description: xiv, 386 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780618634002; 0618634002.Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narratives | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- African Americans | Slaves -- Southern States -- Biography | Freedmen -- United States -- Biography | African Americans -- Biography | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 973.7/11
Contents:
Preface -- Union, 1850 to 1860 -- Prologue : "We done now" -- "Before their time" -- grand man" -- Union, gentlemen, the Union" -- East, 1861 -- "Worser for us than ever" -- "They's folks!" -- West, 1861 and 1862 -- " Grant shelling the rebels!" -- blood run deep" -- "I couldn't leave" -- East, 1862 -- "This child just pray" -- squally time" -- "Ain't God the captain?" -- West, 1863 -- "I rejoiced all i could" -- "Ungodly times" -- "Ain't over yet" -- "Running from the war" -- drizzly day" -- East, 1863 -- "All the poor soldiers" -- "Fearing and trembling" -- West, 1864 -- "Still I rebelled" -- rugged cross" -- "Don't want any such again" -- East, 1864 -- "All that killing" -- most scandalous thing" -- Sherman, 1864 -- "Ain't gonna be long now" -- "What they care? " -- East and West, 1865 -- "I have seen father Abraham" -- plans of God" -- tired old man" -- row's end" -- "Nowhere to go" -- "I got my own again -- Epilogue : "All alike" -- Author's note : "We'll talk this story over" --- directory of witnesses -- Acknowledgments -- Sources -- Index.
Summary: The first narrative history of the Civil War as told by the very people it freed. Historian of nineteenth-century and African-American history Andrew Ward weaves together hundreds of interviews, diaries, letters, and memoirs. Here is the Civil War as seen from slave quarters, kitchens, roadsides, swamps, and fields. Body servants, army cooks and launderers, runaways, teamsters, and gravediggers bring the war to richly detailed life. From slaves' theories about the causes of the Civil War to their frank assessments of major figures; from their searing memories of the carnage of battle to their often startling attitudes toward masters and liberators alike; and from their initial jubilation at the Yankee invasion of the slave South to the crushing disappointment of freedom's promise unfulfilled, this is a transformative vision of America's second revolution.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E464 .W29 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001889872

Includes bibliographical references (p. [354]-372) and index.

The first narrative history of the Civil War as told by the very people it freed. Historian of nineteenth-century and African-American history Andrew Ward weaves together hundreds of interviews, diaries, letters, and memoirs. Here is the Civil War as seen from slave quarters, kitchens, roadsides, swamps, and fields. Body servants, army cooks and launderers, runaways, teamsters, and gravediggers bring the war to richly detailed life. From slaves' theories about the causes of the Civil War to their frank assessments of major figures; from their searing memories of the carnage of battle to their often startling attitudes toward masters and liberators alike; and from their initial jubilation at the Yankee invasion of the slave South to the crushing disappointment of freedom's promise unfulfilled, this is a transformative vision of America's second revolution.--From publisher description.

Preface -- pt. 1. The Union, 1850 to 1860 -- Prologue : "We done now" -- 1. "Before their time" -- 2. "A grand man" -- 3. "The Union, gentlemen, the Union" -- pt. 2. The East, 1861 -- 4. "Worser for us than ever" -- 5. "They's folks!" -- pt. 3. The West, 1861 and 1862 -- 6. " Grant shelling the rebels!" -- 7. "The blood run deep" -- 8. "I couldn't leave" -- pt. 4. The East, 1862 -- 9. "This child just pray" -- 10. "A squally time" -- 11. "Ain't God the captain?" -- pt. 5. The West, 1863 -- 12. "I rejoiced all i could" -- 13. "Ungodly times" -- 14. "Ain't over yet" -- 15. "Running from the war" -- 16. "A drizzly day" -- pt. 6. The East, 1863 -- 17. "All the poor soldiers" -- 18. "Fearing and trembling" -- pt. 7. The West, 1864 -- 19. "Still I rebelled" -- 20. "A rugged cross" -- 21. "Don't want any such again" -- pt. 8. The East, 1864 -- 22. "All that killing" -- 23. "A most scandalous thing" -- pt. 9. Sherman, 1864 -- 24. "Ain't gonna be long now" -- 25. "What they care? " -- pt. 10. East and West, 1865 -- 26. "I have seen father Abraham" -- 27. " The plans of God" -- 28. "A tired old man" -- 29. "The row's end" -- 30. "Nowhere to go" -- 31. "I got my own again -- Epilogue : "All alike" -- Author's note : "We'll talk this story over" --- A directory of witnesses -- Acknowledgments -- Sources -- Index.

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Library Journal Review

A portrait drawn from interviews, letters, diaries, and memoirs. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

A former commentator for National Public Radio and an essayist for the Atlantic Monthly and the Washington Post, ANDREW WARD is a distinguished historian of nineteenth-century and African American history. He is the author of several award-winning works of history, including Our Bones Are Scattered, Dark Midnight When I Rise, and River Run Red. He lives in Davis, California.

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