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North American Indians in the Great War / Susan Applegate Krouse ; photographs and original documentation by Joseph K. Dixon.

By: Krouse, Susan Applegate, 1955-2010.
Contributor(s): Dixon, Joseph Kossuth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in war, society, and the military: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007Description: 248 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780803227781 (cloth : alk. paper); 0803227787 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780803227934; 0803227930.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Participation, Indian | World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives | United States -- Armed Forces -- IndiansAdditional physical formats: Online version:: North American Indians in the Great War.DDC classification: 940.4/03
Contents:
Serving for duty and justice -- Battlefield experiences around the world -- On the front lines as scouts and runners -- Killed in action and other casualties of war -- Noncombat service -- Proud to be a warrior -- The discouraging return home -- Soldiers but not citizens.
Summary: More than twelve thousand American Indians served in the United States military in World War I, even though many were not U.S. citizens and did not enjoy the benefits of enfranchisement. Using the words of the veterans themselves, as collected by Joseph K. Dixon (1856-1926),North American Indians in the Great Warpresents the experiences of American Indian veterans during World War I and after their return home. nbsp; Dixon, a photographer, author, and Indian rights advocate, had hoped that documenting American Indian service in the military would aid the Indian struggle to obtain general U.S. citizenship. Dixon managed to document nearly a quarter of the Indians who had served but was unable to complete his work, and his records languished unexamined until now. Unlike other sources of information on Indian military service collected by government officials, Dixon's records come primarily from the veterans themselves. Their comments reveal pride in upholding an Indian tradition of military service as well as frustration with the U.S. government. Particularly in its immediacy and individuality, Dixon's documentation of American Indian veterans of World War I adds greatly to our understanding of the experiences of American Indians in the U.S. military.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D639 .I56 K76 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001891027

Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-239) and index.

Serving for duty and justice -- Battlefield experiences around the world -- On the front lines as scouts and runners -- Killed in action and other casualties of war -- Noncombat service -- Proud to be a warrior -- The discouraging return home -- Soldiers but not citizens.

More than twelve thousand American Indians served in the United States military in World War I, even though many were not U.S. citizens and did not enjoy the benefits of enfranchisement. Using the words of the veterans themselves, as collected by Joseph K. Dixon (1856-1926),North American Indians in the Great Warpresents the experiences of American Indian veterans during World War I and after their return home. nbsp; Dixon, a photographer, author, and Indian rights advocate, had hoped that documenting American Indian service in the military would aid the Indian struggle to obtain general U.S. citizenship. Dixon managed to document nearly a quarter of the Indians who had served but was unable to complete his work, and his records languished unexamined until now. Unlike other sources of information on Indian military service collected by government officials, Dixon's records come primarily from the veterans themselves. Their comments reveal pride in upholding an Indian tradition of military service as well as frustration with the U.S. government. Particularly in its immediacy and individuality, Dixon's documentation of American Indian veterans of World War I adds greatly to our understanding of the experiences of American Indians in the U.S. military.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Joseph K. Dixon is known today as a photographer as well as an advocate of US citizenship for Native Americans. In this outstanding book that brings out new information not provided in an earlier study by Thomas Britten (American Indians in World War I, CH, Feb'98, 35-3482), anthropologist Krouse (Michigan State Univ.) maintains that Dixon's "real contribution lies in his documentation of the voices of American Indian veterans of World War I." The author mines the questionnaires collected by Dixon and housed in the Wanamaker Collection at Indiana University, and employs the records of the War Department and Office of Indian Affairs. She allows the soldiers to speak for themselves, reminiscent of the approach used by Civil War scholar Gerald Linderman in Embattled Courage (CH, Sep'87). In all, 12,000 Indians, from Alaska to New York, served in WW I for a variety of reasons, including the patriotic defense of their country, their family's warrior tradition, and the hope that by serving, they would show non-Indians that they deserved better treatment. Although Dixon's goal of citizenship came about in 1924, Krouse shows that Indians actually gained too little from their involvement. An excellent book. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. L. M. Hauptman State University of New York at New Paltz

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Susan Applegate Krouse is an associate professor of anthropology and the director of the American Indian studies program at Michigan State University, East Lansing.

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