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Playing with the boys : why separate is not equal in sports / Eileen McDonagh, Laura Pappano.

By: McDonagh, Eileen L.
Contributor(s): Pappano, Laura, 1962-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008Description: xv, 349 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195167566 (hardback : alk. paper); 0195167562 (hardback : alk. paper); 9780195386776 (pbk.); 0195386779 (pbk.).Subject(s): Sports -- Social aspects -- United States | Sex discrimination in sports -- United States | Sex discrimination against women -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Playing with the boys.; Online version:: Playing with the boys.DDC classification: 306.4830973
Contents:
Preface -- Acknowledgments -- What's the problem -- The sex difference question -- Title IX : old norms in new forms -- Sex-segregated sports on trial -- Inventing barriers -- Breaking barriers -- Pass the ball -- Notes -- Index.
Review: "In this forcefully argued book, Eileen McDonagh and Laura Pappano show in vivid detail how women have been unfairly excluded from participating in sports on an equal footing with men. Using powerful examples from the world of contemporary American athletics - girls and women trying to break through in football, ice hockey, wrestling, and baseball to name just a few - the authors show that sex differences are not sufficient to warrant women's coercive exclusion from competing with men; that some sex-group difference actually confer a sports advantage to women; and that "special rules" for women in sports do not simply reflect the "differences" between the sexes, but actively create and reinforce a view that women as a group are inherently inferior to men - even when women clearly are not. For instance, women's bodies give them a physiological advantage in endurance sports like the ultra-marathon and distance swimming. So, why do many Olympic events - from swimming to skiing to running to bike racing - have shorter races for women than men? Likewise, why are women's tennis matches limited to three sets while men's are best-of-fives? This book shows how sex-segregated sports policies, instead of reflecting sex-group differences, in fact construct them."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
GV706.5 .M3673 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001890441

Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-334) and index.

Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. What's the problem -- 2. The sex difference question -- 3. Title IX : old norms in new forms -- 4. Sex-segregated sports on trial -- 5. Inventing barriers -- 6. Breaking barriers -- 7. Pass the ball -- Notes -- Index.

"In this forcefully argued book, Eileen McDonagh and Laura Pappano show in vivid detail how women have been unfairly excluded from participating in sports on an equal footing with men. Using powerful examples from the world of contemporary American athletics - girls and women trying to break through in football, ice hockey, wrestling, and baseball to name just a few - the authors show that sex differences are not sufficient to warrant women's coercive exclusion from competing with men; that some sex-group difference actually confer a sports advantage to women; and that "special rules" for women in sports do not simply reflect the "differences" between the sexes, but actively create and reinforce a view that women as a group are inherently inferior to men - even when women clearly are not. For instance, women's bodies give them a physiological advantage in endurance sports like the ultra-marathon and distance swimming. So, why do many Olympic events - from swimming to skiing to running to bike racing - have shorter races for women than men? Likewise, why are women's tennis matches limited to three sets while men's are best-of-fives? This book shows how sex-segregated sports policies, instead of reflecting sex-group differences, in fact construct them."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

McDonagh (political science, Northeastern Univ.; Breaking the Abortion Deadlock) and journalist Pappano convincingly argue the notion that sports, like politics, higher education, and employment generally, should provide equal opportunity for women. Athletics-the last bastion where segregation by sex is tolerated-are so important in American society that women's marginalization there impedes their social progress. The authors discuss at length how Title IX, the 1972 law that prohibits exclusion-on the basis of sex-from any program receiving federal moneys, got more women playing but actually made sex-segregated teams more common. Marshaling facts, research, and opinions from biology, history, sociology, law, media, and psychology, the authors make their feminist argument more plausibly than does Colette Dowling in The Frailty Myth. By the last third of the book, they really hit their stride, cogently proposing that if occupational equality laws allow for BFOQ (Bona Fide Occupational Qualifications), then sports can provide for BFAQs for athletic qualifications, with some exceptions specified. Highly recommended for all academic libraries.-Kathy Ruffle, Coll. of New Caledonia Lib., Prince George, B.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In this informative, well-written book, McDonagh (political science, Northeastern Univ.) and Pappano (writer in residence, Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College) offer relevant information critical to understanding the role of gender in sport. The authors not only define the specifics of the problem but also probe questions associated with the formulation of gender roles. In discussing sex-segregated sports, they look at past legal/social policies that contribute to the current gender imbalance in sport. Discussions of participation versus competition and the social construction of sports are timely, relevant, and important, particularly regarding current institutional barriers and how they must be broken if women are to enjoy the equality in sport and leisure activities for which they have struggled. And the review of the literature on the impact and repercussions of Title IX and on male hegemony in sports is excellent. Offering conceptual frameworks, case studies, and practical applications, this book will be valuable both as a textbook and in libraries supporting the study of sports and gender, including sociological aspects. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers, all levels. F. G. Polite Institute for Leadership, Ethics & Diversity In Sport

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eileen McDonagh is a professor at Northeastern University and is author of Breaking the Abortion Deadlock.Laura Pappano is an award-winning free-lance journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Working Mother, and Good Housekeeping, among other publications. She is a writer in residence at the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College.

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