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True enough : learning to live in a post-fact society / Farhad Manjoo.

By: Manjoo, Farhad, 1978-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2008Description: v, 250 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780470050101 (cloth); 0470050101 (cloth).Subject(s): Mass media -- Objectivity -- United States | Mass media -- Political aspects -- United States | Journalism -- Objectivity -- United States | Journalism -- Political aspects -- United States | Conspiracies -- United States | Truthfulness and falsehood -- United StatesDDC classification: 177/.3 LOC classification: P96.O242 | U65 2008
Contents:
Introduction: Why facts no longer matter -- "Reality" is splitting -- The new tribalism : swift boats and the power of choosing -- Trusting your senses : selective perception and 9/11 -- Questionable expertise : the stolen election and the men who push it -- The twilight of objectivity, or what's the matter with Lou Dobbs? -- "Truthiness" everywhere -- Epilogue: Living in a world without trust.
Summary: Manjoo presents findings from psychology, sociology, political science, and economics to show how new technologies are prompting the cultural ascendancy of belief over facts.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
P96 .O242 U65 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001890540

Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-243) and index.

Introduction: Why facts no longer matter -- "Reality" is splitting -- The new tribalism : swift boats and the power of choosing -- Trusting your senses : selective perception and 9/11 -- Questionable expertise : the stolen election and the men who push it -- The twilight of objectivity, or what's the matter with Lou Dobbs? -- "Truthiness" everywhere -- Epilogue: Living in a world without trust.

Manjoo presents findings from psychology, sociology, political science, and economics to show how new technologies are prompting the cultural ascendancy of belief over facts.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Manjoo, who manages a daily blog at Salon.com, here demonstrates a basic principle of perception: people see what their background, experience, and training have conditioned them to see. "Truth," he observes, has a quality of relativeness, and beyond one's faulty perceptions one can find many examples of the way "truth" is distorted (e.g., nonfactual conspiracy theories about the Kennedy assassination, the 2004 Ohio presidential election). Manjoo points out that emotional attachment to untruth can be very strong, as in an HIV-positive woman publicly denying the connection between HIV and AIDS while her AIDS-infected daughter dies in her arms. But particularly disturbing are those who know the truth and lie about it: think tanks that produce spurious "expert" analyses; corporations that produce studies to disprove scientific realities (the connection between smoking and cancer or hydrocarbons and global warming); governments that mislead the populace (many Americans are still convinced that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction). Manjoo includes endnotes but does not key them to the text. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers, all levels. P. E. Kane emeritus, SUNY College at Brockport

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Farhad Manjoo manages Machinist, a daily technology news blog at Salon.com, where he also writes frequently on journalism, politics, and new media.

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