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Releasing prisoners, redeeming communities : reentry, race, and politics / Anthony C. Thompson.

By: Thompson, Anthony C.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : New York University Press, c2008Description: ix, 262 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780814783030 (cloth : alk. paper); 0814783031 (cloth : alk. paper); 081478321X (pbk.); 9780814783214 (pbk.).Subject(s): Ex-convicts -- United States | Criminals -- Rehabilitation -- United States | Minorities -- United States -- Social conditions | Prisoners -- Deinstitutionalization -- United StatesDDC classification: 365/.6470973
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1: Reentry, race, and stigma -- 2: Media influence on public perceptions of prison life -- 3: Women: the afterthought in reentry planning -- 4: Reentry and housing -- 5: Reentry and health care -- 6: Reentry and unemployment -- 7: Reentry and the political process -- 8: Reentry and parole -- 9: Reentry courts -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index -- About the author.
Summary: Synopsis: In the middle of the first decade of the twenty-first century, African Americans made up approximately twelve percent of the United States population but close to forty percent of the United States prison population. Now, in the latter half of the decade, the nation is in the midst of the largest multi-year discharge of prisoners in its history. In Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities, Anthony C. Thompson discusses what is likely to happen to these ex-offenders and why. For Thompson, any discussion of ex-offender reentry is, de facto, a question of race. After laying out the statistics, he identifies the ways in which media and politics have contributed to the problem, especially through stereotyping and racial bias. Well aware of the potential consequences if this country fails to act, Thompson offers concrete, realizable ideas of how our policies could, and should, change.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV9275 .T56 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001890656

Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-241) and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1: Reentry, race, and stigma -- 2: Media influence on public perceptions of prison life -- 3: Women: the afterthought in reentry planning -- 4: Reentry and housing -- 5: Reentry and health care -- 6: Reentry and unemployment -- 7: Reentry and the political process -- 8: Reentry and parole -- 9: Reentry courts -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index -- About the author.

Synopsis: In the middle of the first decade of the twenty-first century, African Americans made up approximately twelve percent of the United States population but close to forty percent of the United States prison population. Now, in the latter half of the decade, the nation is in the midst of the largest multi-year discharge of prisoners in its history. In Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities, Anthony C. Thompson discusses what is likely to happen to these ex-offenders and why. For Thompson, any discussion of ex-offender reentry is, de facto, a question of race. After laying out the statistics, he identifies the ways in which media and politics have contributed to the problem, especially through stereotyping and racial bias. Well aware of the potential consequences if this country fails to act, Thompson offers concrete, realizable ideas of how our policies could, and should, change.

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CHOICE Review

The record size of the US prison population in recent years has received some attention, and it is well known that young men of color are greatly overrepresented in this prison population. The inevitable release annually of hundreds of thousands of these prisoners very disproportionately into inner-city minority communities has been relatively little discussed. In this book, NYU law professor Thompson explores in considerable depth the devastating impact of this mass influx on these communities, and the deeply disturbing lack of adequate programs and appropriate forms of assistance to constructively reintegrate former prisoners back into such communities. The author frames his analysis in terms of the enduring racial dimensions reflected in the mass media and the political realm, and the effects of stigmatizing men of color. The penal process increasingly affects women of color in myriad ways as well. Thompson systematically addresses reentry issues in relation to housing, health care, and unemployment, and examines the specific role of the courts, parole process, and political system. The book concludes with a series of constructive proposals that, if adopted, could greatly enhance reentry for all concerned. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. O. Friedrichs University of Scranton

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