The pirate queen : Queen Elizabeth I, her pirate adventurers, and the dawn of empire / Susan Ronald.

By: Ronald, SusanMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, c2007Edition: 1st edDescription: xxiv, 471 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cmISBN: 9780060820664; 0060820667Subject(s): Elizabeth I, Queen of England, 1533-1603 | Elizabeth I, Queen of England, 1533-1603 -- Relations with merchants | Great Britain -- History, Naval -- Tudors, 1485-1603 -- Economic aspects | Great Britain -- History -- Elizabeth, 1558-1603 -- Sources | Queens -- Great Britain -- BiographyDDC classification: 942.05/5092 | B LOC classification: DA356 | .R58 2007
Contents:
pt. 1. The desperate quest for security. -- The Lord's doing -- A realm exhausted -- The Queen, Her merchants and gentlemen -- The quest for cash -- The merchants adventurers, Antwerp, and Muscovy -- The politics of piracy, trade, and religion -- Raising the stakes -- Cunning deceits -- The gloves are off -- Lovell's lamentable voyage -- The troublesome voyage of John Hawkins -- pt. 2. Harvesting the sea. -- The Queen and Alba's pay ships -- The cost of failure -- Undeclared holy war -- Drake's war -- The dread of future foes -- Drake at the treasure house of the world -- From a treetop in Darien -- Success at a cost -- Dr. Dee's nursery and the Northwest Passage -- Dark days at Rathlin Island -- Drake's perfect timing --The Northwest and the Company of Kathai -- In the shadow of Magellan -- Into the jaws of death -- The famous voyage -- The world is not enough -- Elizabeth strikes back in the Levant -- Katherine Champernowne's sons take up the American dream -- The defeats of 1582-84 -- Water! -- Roanoke -- pt. 3. The Spanish War. -- The Queen lets loose her dragon -- The camel's back -- Cadiz -- The plundering of the Spanish Armada -- America again ... and again? -- The last gasp of the early roaring 90's -- pt. 4. Dawn of empire. -- The alchemy that turned plunder into trade -- Essex, Ireland, and tragedy -- Raleigh, Virginia, and empire -- The East and the East India Company -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1 : The Petty Navy Royal -- Appendix 2 : The Flotilla from New Spain of August 1587.
Summary: Dubbed the "pirate queen" by the Vatican and Philip II of Spain, Elizabeth I was feared and admired by her enemies. Extravagant, whimsical, and hot-tempered, she was the epitome of power. Her visionary accomplishments were made possible by her daring merchants, gifted rapscallion adventurers, astronomer philosophers, and her stalwart Privy Council. All these men contributed their genius, power, greed, and expertise to the advancement of England. Historian Ronald offers a fresh look at Elizabeth I, focusing on her uncanny instinct for financial survival and the superior intellect that propelled and sustained her rise. The foundation of Elizabeth's empire was built on a carefully choreographed strategy whereby piracy transformed England from an impoverished state on the fringes of Europe into the first building block of an empire that ultimately covered two-fifths of the world.--From publisher description.
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DA356 .R58 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001892231

Includes bibliographical references (p. [430]-442) and index.

Dubbed the "pirate queen" by the Vatican and Philip II of Spain, Elizabeth I was feared and admired by her enemies. Extravagant, whimsical, and hot-tempered, she was the epitome of power. Her visionary accomplishments were made possible by her daring merchants, gifted rapscallion adventurers, astronomer philosophers, and her stalwart Privy Council. All these men contributed their genius, power, greed, and expertise to the advancement of England. Historian Ronald offers a fresh look at Elizabeth I, focusing on her uncanny instinct for financial survival and the superior intellect that propelled and sustained her rise. The foundation of Elizabeth's empire was built on a carefully choreographed strategy whereby piracy transformed England from an impoverished state on the fringes of Europe into the first building block of an empire that ultimately covered two-fifths of the world.--From publisher description.

pt. 1. The desperate quest for security. -- The Lord's doing -- A realm exhausted -- The Queen, Her merchants and gentlemen -- The quest for cash -- The merchants adventurers, Antwerp, and Muscovy -- The politics of piracy, trade, and religion -- Raising the stakes -- Cunning deceits -- The gloves are off -- Lovell's lamentable voyage -- The troublesome voyage of John Hawkins -- pt. 2. Harvesting the sea. -- The Queen and Alba's pay ships -- The cost of failure -- Undeclared holy war -- Drake's war -- The dread of future foes -- Drake at the treasure house of the world -- From a treetop in Darien -- Success at a cost -- Dr. Dee's nursery and the Northwest Passage -- Dark days at Rathlin Island -- Drake's perfect timing --The Northwest and the Company of Kathai -- In the shadow of Magellan -- Into the jaws of death -- The famous voyage -- The world is not enough -- Elizabeth strikes back in the Levant -- Katherine Champernowne's sons take up the American dream -- The defeats of 1582-84 -- Water! -- Roanoke -- pt. 3. The Spanish War. -- The Queen lets loose her dragon -- The camel's back -- Cadiz -- The plundering of the Spanish Armada -- America again ... and again? -- The last gasp of the early roaring 90's -- pt. 4. Dawn of empire. -- The alchemy that turned plunder into trade -- Essex, Ireland, and tragedy -- Raleigh, Virginia, and empire -- The East and the East India Company -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1 : The Petty Navy Royal -- Appendix 2 : The Flotilla from New Spain of August 1587.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Historian Ronald (The Sancy Blood Diamond) emigrated to England from the United States over 20 years ago and became an adviser to England's National Trust. Coming from a mercantile background (her father was a diamond merchant) no doubt influenced Ronald as she lovingly pored over the intricate details of the rise of Elizabethan England's merchant adventurers for this book. Casual readers may find the sheer mass of financial minutiae and numerous players difficult to follow. The narrative emphasizes the commercial and naval issues of the period, and those looking for a biography ripe with the social intrigue for which Elizabeth's reign was famous will likely be disappointed. Still, Ronald paints a gripping tale of the great brilliance (and often great luck) of Elizabeth I and her advisers as they molded merchants and plunderers into a national defense force, defeating the powerful Spanish Armada and transforming a weak and bankrupt country into a nascent empire. Recommended for academic libraries.-Tessa L.H. Minchew, Georgia Perimeter Coll., Clarkston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Ronald tells the story of Elizabeth I's reign through her relationships with her "pirates," the adventurers who created wealth for England (and for themselves) through trade, exploration, and plunder. The author relies on--and quotes to good effect--thousands of letters between Elizabeth and her courtiers, advisers, and foreign adversaries, as well as other sources, printed and manuscript. She argues that Elizabeth was especially concerned with the security of her realm, and achieved this through the actions of various types of adventurers, who provided cash to pay for soldiers and other military expenses. They also created a new type of empire by first "interloping" in Spanish and Portuguese trade, which the Iberian powers saw as piracy and the English saw as the promotion of free trade. Elizabeth's efforts at security were further achieved through staying out of foreign wars during the early part of her reign, and then using her new wealth wisely in the battle against Spain. Ronald emphasizes the actions and personalities of individuals, both well known and obscure. Her book, designed for a general audience, includes a glossary, notes, and an extensive bibliographic essay. Summing Up: Recommended. General/undergraduate/public libraries. M. E. Wiesner University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee

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