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Seneca Falls and the origins of the women's rights movement / by Sally McMillen.

By: McMillen, Sally Gregory, 1944-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Pivotal moments in American history: Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2008Description: x, 310 p. : ports. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195182651 (alk. paper); 0195182650 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Feminism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Woman's Rights Convention (1st : 1848 : Seneca Falls, N.Y.)Additional physical formats: Online version:: Seneca Falls and the origins of the women's rights movement.DDC classification: 305.420973/09034
Contents:
Separate spheres : law, faith, tradition -- Fashioning a better world -- Seneca Falls -- The women's movement begins, 1850-1860 -- War, disillusionment, division -- Friction and reunification, 1870-1890 -- Epilogue : "Make the world better" -- Appendix A: Declaration of Rights and Sentiments -- Appendix B: "Solitude of Self" / Elizabeth Cady Stanton : address delivered by Mrs. Stanton before the Committee of the Judiciary, U.S. Congress, January 18, 1892.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1418 .M36 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001892116
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
HQ1418 .F56 2008 She's got a gun / HQ1418 .G58 2000 Women in antebellum reform / HQ1418 .K47 Women of the Republic : HQ1418 .M36 2008 Seneca Falls and the origins of the women's rights movement / HQ1418 .N56 1978 The Nineteenth-century woman : HQ1418 .S38 1970 The Southern lady: from pedestal to politics, 1830-1930. HQ1418 .W66 1987 The Women's West /

Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-295) and index.

Separate spheres : law, faith, tradition -- Fashioning a better world -- Seneca Falls -- The women's movement begins, 1850-1860 -- War, disillusionment, division -- Friction and reunification, 1870-1890 -- Epilogue : "Make the world better" -- Appendix A: Declaration of Rights and Sentiments -- Appendix B: "Solitude of Self" / Elizabeth Cady Stanton : address delivered by Mrs. Stanton before the Committee of the Judiciary, U.S. Congress, January 18, 1892.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This book joins a plethora of similar titles that include Eleanor Flexner's 1959 classic Century of Struggle and notable recent works such as Judith Wellman's The Road to Seneca Falls and Lori Ginzberg's Untidy Origins. While it covers familiar ground, it reflects current scholarship and provides a balanced assessment of the early woman's rights movement and its leaders. McMillen (history, Davidson Coll.) describes the birth of the movement at the 1848 Seneca Falls, NY, convention, its growth over the next decade, and the post-Civil War dissention that split the movement into two competing national organizations, the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Woman's Suffrage Association (AWSA). She highlights the lives of four leaders-Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone-but does not neglect the many other individuals who played noteworthy roles. The book concludes with the reunification of NWSA and AWSA in 1890 as a second generation of women took up the banner for suffrage and equal rights. The result is a useful text for undergraduate history and women's studies courses; general readers will also find it accessible and informative. Recommended for academic and public libraries.-Linda V. Carlisle, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The lives of four extraordinary reformers--Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony--frame this study of Seneca Falls as a catalyst for the 19th-century women's movement. Extensive use of family and organization papers personalizes their courage in challenging institutionalized economic, legal, social, and political oppression, devoting their lives to this radical cause, and sustaining their activism over a half century. McMillen's engaging narrative deftly accentuates how the 1848 Declaration of Rights and Sentiments might have been just so many words on the page without the dedication of these pioneering activists. One might question the author's assertion that woman suffrage may have been achieved much earlier had the reformers worked together, ignoring their differences. That statement diminishes the enormity of institutional and public opposition. To enfranchise women was to utterly transform perceptions of women and fundamentally alter power relations in the US. McMillen (Davidson College) provides a highly readable, comprehensive history of this pivotal event. Like Jean Baker's Sisters: The Lives of America's Suffragists (2005), this book reveals the human side of this revolutionary reform movement. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General and undergraduate collections. C. M. Kennedy Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sally McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History and Department Chair at Davidson College. She is the author of Motherhood in the Old South and Southern Women: Black and White in the Old South. She lives in Davidson, North Carolina.

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