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African Cherokees in Indian territory : from chattel to citizens / Celia E. Naylor.

By: Naylor, Celia E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: The John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture. Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008Description: xii, 360 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780807832035 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807832030 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807858837 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0807858838 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Cherokee Indians -- History -- 19th century | Cherokee Indians -- Mixed descent | Cherokee Indians -- Kinship | Indian slaves -- Oklahoma -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Oklahoma | African Americans -- Kinship -- Oklahoma | Blacks -- Oklahoma -- Relations with Indians
Contents:
On the run in antebellum Indian territory -- Day-to-day resistance to the peculiar institution and the struggle to remain free in the antebellum Cherokee nation -- Conceptualizing and constructing African Indian racial and cultural identities in antebellum Indian territory -- Trapped in the turmoil : a divided Cherokee nation and the plight of enslaved African Cherokees during the Civil War era -- Cherokee freedpeople's struggle for recognition and rights during reconstruction -- Contested common ground : landownership, race politics, and segregation on the eve of statehood.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E99 .C5 N39 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001891696

Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-341) and index.

On the run in antebellum Indian territory -- Day-to-day resistance to the peculiar institution and the struggle to remain free in the antebellum Cherokee nation -- Conceptualizing and constructing African Indian racial and cultural identities in antebellum Indian territory -- Trapped in the turmoil : a divided Cherokee nation and the plight of enslaved African Cherokees during the Civil War era -- Cherokee freedpeople's struggle for recognition and rights during reconstruction -- Contested common ground : landownership, race politics, and segregation on the eve of statehood.

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CHOICE Review

Among the Indian population making the forced removal to Indian Territory along the Trail of Tears in the winter of 1839-40 were a number of African-descended people, most of whom were slaves of the Indians. The move to Indian Territory did not bring about significant changes in the slaves' status. The Cherokee created a body of slave laws similar to that of the slaveholding states, designed to control the slaves' behavior. As among the larger US population, the relationship between one drop of blood and racial identity became part of Cherokee culture. Ideas of blood and identity became more complex as other distinctions were developed that involved Cherokee identity, such as "mixed blood" and "full blood," and were adopted by enslaved African Indians. In 1863, the Cherokee National Council freed all persons held as slaves. However, it did not take up the matter of incorporating the freed people within the Nation. This was achieved in the Treaty of 1866, which extended to the Cherokee freedmen all the rights of Native Cherokees. However, the freed people found that their claims to Cherokee citizenship, including land settlement, became subject to certain limitations. All told, the freed people found their rights severely limited. A well researched, documented, and presented study. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. A. Sio emeritus, Colgate University

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