Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Persepolis 2 : the story of a return / Marjane Satrapi.

By: Satrapi, Marjane, 1969-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c2004Description: 187 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0375422889; 9780375422881; 0375714669 (pbk.); 9780375714665 (pbk.).Other title: Persepolis two.Uniform titles: Persepolis 2. English Subject(s): Satrapi, Marjane, 1969- -- Comic books, strips, etc | Iranians -- 20th century -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Iran -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Iran -- History -- 1979-1997 -- Comic books, strips, etcGenre/Form: Graphic novels. | Graphic novels -- France. | Graphic novels -- United States. | Autobiographical comic books, strips, etc.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Persepolis 2.DDC classification: 741.5/944 | 955.05/42/092 | B
Contents:
The soup -- Tyrol -- Pasta -- The pill -- The vegetable -- The horse -- Hide and seek -- The croissant -- The veil -- The return -- The joke -- Skiing -- The exam -- The makeup -- The convocation -- The socks -- The wedding -- The satellite -- The end.
Summary: The great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists continues her description of growing up in Tehran--a country plagued by political upheaval and vast contradictions between public and private life.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PN6747 .S245 P4713 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001891373

Sequel to: Persepolis.

Translated from the French.

The soup -- Tyrol -- Pasta -- The pill -- The vegetable -- The horse -- Hide and seek -- The croissant -- The veil -- The return -- The joke -- Skiing -- The exam -- The makeup -- The convocation -- The socks -- The wedding -- The satellite -- The end.

The great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists continues her description of growing up in Tehran--a country plagued by political upheaval and vast contradictions between public and private life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Satrapi's first Persepolis book, chronicling her life as a child in Iran during the Islamic Revolution and the war with Iraq, was one of the best and most widely praised graphic novels of 2003. This second volume picks up the story as she arrives in Vienna to attend high school and recounts her difficult, though not friendless, assimilation into a far more liberal culture. She's stung by prejudice and shocked when her friends first engage in casual sex. When she returns to her homeland, she faces another culture shock, as her now-entrenched free-thinking attitude makes acceptance of everyday repression even tougher. Feeling like a woman without a country, she must decide where her future lies. As with the first volume, Satrapi's simple drawings are very effective, and the story is laced with humor and surprising instances of Western infiltration of Eastern culture. Satrapi movingly portrays the love and wisdom of her parents, who are determined to let her live her own life, and of her grandmother, who reproaches her when she strays too far. Like the first volume, this remarkable memoir is highly recommended for older teens and adults. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 4/15/04.] (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-In Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood (Pantheon, 2003), Satrapi vividly described her early life in Iran. This second installment covers the period after the 1979 Revolution when, at 14, she was sent to Vienna for a freer education than that allowed in her newly fundamentalist country. At first, the distinct differences in her life were overwhelming and exciting. During the next four years, she made new friends, some very liberal and some quite conservative, had several relationships, became increasingly aware of the sexual freedom of her new milieu, and even dealt drugs for a boyfriend. Eventually, she ended up living on the streets. She became ill and returned home, a somewhat liberated 18-year-old in a repressive land. She married, mistakenly thinking that would allow her freedom, and graduated from art school. At the end of this volume, feeling out of place in her homeland and unhappy in her marriage, she has divorced and is preparing to move to France with the blessing of her understanding parents. (A third volume is soon to be translated.) Satrapi's simple-seeming, black-and-white drawings add a surprisingly expressive depth to her already compelling story. Teens will appreciate this memoir on many levels, identifying with the feelings of alienation and misunderstanding, if not the actual events. Young people who have had to flee to new environments will identify even more.-Susan H. Woodcock, Fairfax County Public Library, Chantilly, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MARJANE SATRAPI was born in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris, where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including The New Yorker and The New York Times. She is the author of Persepolis, Persepolis 2, Embroideries, Chicken with Plums, and several children's books. She cowrote and codirected the animated feature film version of Persepolis, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. Her most recent film was a live-action version of Chicken with Plums.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.