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The Supreme Court : an essential history / Peter Charles Hoffer, Williamjames Hull Hoffer, N.E.H. Hull.

By: Hoffer, Peter Charles, 1944-.
Contributor(s): Hoffer, Williamjames | Hull, N. E. H, 1949-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2007Description: ix, 491 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780700615384 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700615385 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States. Supreme Court -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Supreme Court.DDC classification: 347.73/26 LOC classification: KF8742.Z9 | H64 2007Other classification: 86.15 | 15.85
Contents:
The origins of the U.S. Supreme Court -- The Jay and Ellsworth courts, 1789-1801 -- The Marshall court, 1801-1835 -- The Taney court, 1836-1864 -- The Chase court, 1864-1873 -- The Waite court, 1874-1888 -- The Fuller court, 1888-1910 -- The White court, 1910-1921 -- The Taft court, 1921-1930 -- The Hughes court, 1930-1941 -- The Stone court, 1941-1946 -- The Vinson court, 1946-1952 -- The Warren court, 1953-1969 -- The Burger court, 1969-1986 -- The Rehnquist court, 1986-2005.
Summary: For more than two centuries, the U.S. Supreme Court has provided a battleground for nearly every controversial issue in our nation's history. Now a veteran team of talented historians--including the editors of the acclaimed Landmark Law Cases and American Society series--have produced the most readable, astute, and up-to-date single-volume history of this venerated institution, as engaging for general readers as it is rigorous for scholars. The Supreme Court chronicles an institution that dramatically evolved from six men meeting in borrowed quarters to the most closely watched tribunal in the world. Underscoring the close connection between law and politics, the authors highlight essential issues, cases, and decisions within the context of the times in which the decisions were handed down. Deftly combining doctrine and judicial biography with case law, they demonstrate how the justices have shaped the law and how the law that the Court makes has shaped our nation, with an emphasis on how the Court responded--or failed to respond--to the plight of the underdog. Each chapter covers the Court's years under a specific Chief Justice, focusing on cases that are the most reflective of the way the Court saw the law and the world and that had the most impact on the lives of ordinary Americans. Throughout the authors reveal how--in times of war, class strife, or moral revolution--the Court sometimes voiced the conscience of the nation and sometimes seemed to lose its moral compass. Their extensive quotes from the Court's opinions and dissents illuminate its inner workings, as well as the personalities and beliefs of the justices and the often-contentious relationships among them. Fair-minded andsharply insightful, The Supreme Court portrays an institution defined by eloquent and pedestrian decisions and by justices ranging from brilliant and wise to slow-witted and expedient. An epic and essential story, it illuminates the Court's role in our lives and its place in our history.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF8742 .Z9 H64 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001904820
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
KF8742 .O27 1996 Storm center : KF8742 .R62 Nine men : KF8742 .W66 1981 The Brethren : KF8742 .Z9 H64 2007 The Supreme Court : KF8744 .D8 Mr. Justice, KF8744 .F75 V.1 The justices of the United States Supreme Court, 1789-1969, KF8744 .F75 V.2 The justices of the United States Supreme Court, 1789-1969,

Includes bibliographical references (p. [463]-478) and index.

The origins of the U.S. Supreme Court -- The Jay and Ellsworth courts, 1789-1801 -- The Marshall court, 1801-1835 -- The Taney court, 1836-1864 -- The Chase court, 1864-1873 -- The Waite court, 1874-1888 -- The Fuller court, 1888-1910 -- The White court, 1910-1921 -- The Taft court, 1921-1930 -- The Hughes court, 1930-1941 -- The Stone court, 1941-1946 -- The Vinson court, 1946-1952 -- The Warren court, 1953-1969 -- The Burger court, 1969-1986 -- The Rehnquist court, 1986-2005.

For more than two centuries, the U.S. Supreme Court has provided a battleground for nearly every controversial issue in our nation's history. Now a veteran team of talented historians--including the editors of the acclaimed Landmark Law Cases and American Society series--have produced the most readable, astute, and up-to-date single-volume history of this venerated institution, as engaging for general readers as it is rigorous for scholars. The Supreme Court chronicles an institution that dramatically evolved from six men meeting in borrowed quarters to the most closely watched tribunal in the world. Underscoring the close connection between law and politics, the authors highlight essential issues, cases, and decisions within the context of the times in which the decisions were handed down. Deftly combining doctrine and judicial biography with case law, they demonstrate how the justices have shaped the law and how the law that the Court makes has shaped our nation, with an emphasis on how the Court responded--or failed to respond--to the plight of the underdog. Each chapter covers the Court's years under a specific Chief Justice, focusing on cases that are the most reflective of the way the Court saw the law and the world and that had the most impact on the lives of ordinary Americans. Throughout the authors reveal how--in times of war, class strife, or moral revolution--the Court sometimes voiced the conscience of the nation and sometimes seemed to lose its moral compass. Their extensive quotes from the Court's opinions and dissents illuminate its inner workings, as well as the personalities and beliefs of the justices and the often-contentious relationships among them. Fair-minded andsharply insightful, The Supreme Court portrays an institution defined by eloquent and pedestrian decisions and by justices ranging from brilliant and wise to slow-witted and expedient. An epic and essential story, it illuminates the Court's role in our lives and its place in our history.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This ambitious book chronicles the Supreme Court from its colonial origins to the end of the Rehnquist era. Peter Charles Hoffer (history, Univ. of Georgia), Williamjames Hoffer (history, Seton Hall Coll.), and N.E.H. Hull (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers Univ.) combine their expertise to give their topic a thorough exploration, moving chronologically from the Constitutional Convention through each chief justice's time on the Court. One of the book's strengths is the discussion of the associate justices and their particular contributions. For example, in U.S v. Carolene Products (1938), involving issues of economic regulation, Justice Harlan Fiske Stone's footnote said that certain matters, such as instances of discrimination against minorities, might require stricter standards of judicial review. Such standards were applied to women's rights, civil rights, and criminals' rights by later courts and are in force today. The authors also discuss the issues that shaped each era, such as civil rights during the Warren Court, and note in an epilog that at the start of the Roberts era the Court's future path is unclear. The book's historical rather than strictly legal contextualizing distinguishes it from other Court histories. Recommended for academic and large public libraries.-Becky Kennedy, Atlanta-Fulton P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

For those looking for a concise one-volume history of the Supreme Court--its major rulings, its political context, and its major justices--this is the book. Organizing their text around the terms of office of the 15 chief justices who presided over the court between 1789 and 2005, the authors masterfully weave together accounts of doctrinal developments, the political crises that engendered them, and the often larger-than-life personalities of the Court's most significant justices. One sees US history in a new light, and comes to appreciate the role of the Supreme Court in shaping that history. This is not a coffee-table book or panegyric to the law, but a rigorous and fair-minded account of one of America's most important governmental institutions by a trio of distinguished historians. It is a stunning achievement, of great value to a wide range of readers: professional historians and legal scholars who need a refresher course or want to extend the range of their expertise; historians who want to explore the role of the Supreme Court in American history; and college students who want to understand the role of the Court in the US system of government. Summing Up: Essential. All levels. M. M. Feeley University of California, Berkeley

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