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White cargo : the forgotten history of Britain's White slaves in America / Don Jordan and Michael Walsh.

By: Jordan, Don.
Contributor(s): Walsh, Michael.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington Square, N.Y. : New York University Press, 2008, c2007Description: 320 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780814742723 (alk. paper); 0814742726 (alk. paper); 9780814742969 (pbk.); 0814742963 (pbk.).Subject(s): Slavery -- United States -- History -- 17th century | Slavery -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Whites -- United States -- Social conditions -- 17th century | Whites -- United States -- Social conditions -- 18th century | Indentured servants -- United States -- History | United States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 | Whites -- Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 17th century | Whites -- Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 18th century | Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 17th century | Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 18th centuryDDC classification: 306.3/62097309034
Contents:
In the shadow of the myth -- A place for the unwanted -- The judge's dream -- The merchant prince -- Children of the city -- The jagged edge -- "They are not dogs" -- The people trade -- Spirited away -- Foreigners in their own land -- Dissent in the north -- The planter from Angola -- "Barbadosed" -- The grandees -- Bacon's rebellion -- Queen Anne's golden book -- Disunity in the union -- Lost and found -- "His Majesty's seven-year passengers" -- The last hurrah.
Summary: Thousands of Britons lived and died in bondage in Britain's American colonies.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E446 .J665 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001904853

Originally published : Edinburgh : Mainstream Pub., c2007.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-312) and index.

Thousands of Britons lived and died in bondage in Britain's American colonies.

In the shadow of the myth -- A place for the unwanted -- The judge's dream -- The merchant prince -- Children of the city -- The jagged edge -- "They are not dogs" -- The people trade -- Spirited away -- Foreigners in their own land -- Dissent in the north -- The planter from Angola -- "Barbadosed" -- The grandees -- Bacon's rebellion -- Queen Anne's golden book -- Disunity in the union -- Lost and found -- "His Majesty's seven-year passengers" -- The last hurrah.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The historical film documentary is a sophisticated popular art form in Britain. This book by two documentary film writers brings the methods and assumptions of that art into print. The subject is the forced migration into Colonial America of some 200,000 to 300,000 Britons who were "slaves in all but name." The result is a colorful series of portraits of villains and victims, exploiters and exploited, rendered with bemused outrage. The work centers on Virginia, Maryland, and Barbados during the 17th century, where imported servants included street children, criminals, vagrants, Irish captives, and youth kidnapped mainly from ports. The awful conditions of work and transport and the appalling death rates are not slighted. Nor are the initiators and perpetrators. The portraits of such Jacobean rascals as Sir John Popham, a highwayman who became chief justice in England, are particularly good. The last third of the book, on the 18th century, is a comparative account of German and Scot immigrant workers. The 19 chapters are short. The bibliography of primary and secondary sources is extensive. Footnoting is erratic and is not paginated. There are also uncited anomalies such as "maroon communities of the Cumberland Plateau" during the 1680s. In short, this is decent popular history. Summing Up: Recommended. General, public, and undergraduate collections. R. P. Gildrie emeritus, Austin Peay State University

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