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Reconstructing the Dreamland : the Tulsa riot of 1921 : race, reparations, and reconcilation / Alfred L. Brophy.

By: Brophy, Alfred L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002Description: xx, 187 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0195146859 (alk. paper); 9780195146851 (alk. paper).Subject(s): African Americans -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa -- History -- 20th century | African American neighborhoods -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa -- History -- 20th century | Riots -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa -- History -- 20th century | Violence -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa -- History -- 20th century | Tulsa (Okla.) -- Race relations | African Americans -- Reparations -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa | Racism -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 976.6/86 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Prologue -- Seeking justice and the origins of the riot -- "Thinking he can whip the world": the riot -- Picturing the riot -- "A white wash brush and a big one in operation in Tulsa": Tulsa interprets the riot -- Tulsa will! Tulsa will! Tulsa will dodge: the failure of reconstruction -- Epilogue.
Review: "The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot was the country's bloodiest civil disturbance of the century. With perhaps 150 dead, 30 city blocks burned to the ground, and more than a thousand families homeless, the riot represented an unprecedented breakdown of the rule of law. It left the prosperous black community of Greenwood, Oklahoma reduced to rubble." "In Reconstructing the Dreamland, Alfred Brophy draws on his own extensive research into contemporary accounts and court documents to chronicle this devastating riot, showing how and why the rule of law quickly eroded. Brophy offers a gut-wrenching portrait of mob violence and racism run amok, both on the night of the riot and the morning after, when a coordinated sunrise attack, accompanied by airplanes, stormed through Greenwood, torching and looting the community. Equallty important, he shows how the city government and police not only permitted the looting, shootings, and burning of Greenwood, but actively participated in it. The police department, fearing that Greenwood was erupting into a "negro uprising" (which Brophy shows was not the case), deputized white citizens haphazardly, gave out guns and badges with little background check, or sent men to hardware stores to arm themselves. Likewise, the Tulsa-based units of the National Guard acted unconstitutionally, arresting every black resident they could find, leaving Greenwood property vulnerable to the white mob, special deputies, and police that followed behind and burned it."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F704 .T92 B76 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001906874

Includes bibliographical references (p. 176-182) and index.

Prologue -- Seeking justice and the origins of the riot -- "Thinking he can whip the world": the riot -- Picturing the riot -- "A white wash brush and a big one in operation in Tulsa": Tulsa interprets the riot -- Tulsa will! Tulsa will! Tulsa will dodge: the failure of reconstruction -- Epilogue.

"The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot was the country's bloodiest civil disturbance of the century. With perhaps 150 dead, 30 city blocks burned to the ground, and more than a thousand families homeless, the riot represented an unprecedented breakdown of the rule of law. It left the prosperous black community of Greenwood, Oklahoma reduced to rubble." "In Reconstructing the Dreamland, Alfred Brophy draws on his own extensive research into contemporary accounts and court documents to chronicle this devastating riot, showing how and why the rule of law quickly eroded. Brophy offers a gut-wrenching portrait of mob violence and racism run amok, both on the night of the riot and the morning after, when a coordinated sunrise attack, accompanied by airplanes, stormed through Greenwood, torching and looting the community. Equallty important, he shows how the city government and police not only permitted the looting, shootings, and burning of Greenwood, but actively participated in it. The police department, fearing that Greenwood was erupting into a "negro uprising" (which Brophy shows was not the case), deputized white citizens haphazardly, gave out guns and badges with little background check, or sent men to hardware stores to arm themselves. Likewise, the Tulsa-based units of the National Guard acted unconstitutionally, arresting every black resident they could find, leaving Greenwood property vulnerable to the white mob, special deputies, and police that followed behind and burned it."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

One of America's bloodiest civil disturbances is also one of its least known. On May 31,1921, Tulsa's African American community of Greenwood was the site of a violent riot that left more than 30 city blocks burned, thousands homeless, and up to 300 dead. Fearing that a young man was going to be lynched for assaulting a young white woman, members of Tulsa's African American community rallied at the courthouse. Seeing the large body of African Americans, some of whom had guns, in their part of town, whites armed themselves with all the weapons they could muster. A hail of fire erupted, and by the next day the National Guard and a mob of hastily deputized white citizens stormed the African American neighborhood of Greenwood, laying it to waste and incarcerating its residents in camps. These two works each seek to clarify what happened, but they take quite different approaches. Law professor Brophy served on the Tulsa Race Riot Commission, which was charged with determining exactly what happened and whether survivors should receive restitution. His book reflects his work on the commission, focusing on the legal issues surrounding the incident. He asserts that the riot was government-assisted and as such that the victims and their heirs are due compensation. This work fits very well into the growing national debate on reparations. Hirsch, the author of the best-selling Hurricane, seeks a broader audience in his book, which emphasizes events following the riot, including the thwarted attempts to rebuild Greenwood and how Tulsa and Oklahoma sought to come to terms with the riot. Although different in tone and approach, both books are very solid in their research and writing. Each is highly recommended, although Brophy's account will appeal to the more serious reader. Daniel Liestman, Florida Gulf Coast Univ., Ft. Myers (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alfred L. Brophy is Professor of Law at the University of Alabama, in Tuscaloosa. An authority on the 1921 riot, he contributed to the report to the Tulsa Race Riot Commission, a body created by the Oklahoma Legislature to investigate the riot and make recommendations for reparations.

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