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From Roosevelt to Truman : Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War / Wilson D. Miscamble.

By: Miscamble, Wilson D, 1954-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007Description: xx, 393 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0521862442 (hardback); 9780521862448 (hardback); 9780521728584 (paperback); 0521728584 (paperback); 9780521862448.Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1953 | Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Diplomatic history | World War, 1939-1945 -- United States | Nuclear warfare -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Cold WarDDC classification: 327.73009/044
Contents:
Preparation : the making of an (American) internationalist -- Inheritance : Franklin Roosevelt's uncertain legacy -- Initiation : tactical reversal, strategic continuity -- Instruction : Truman's advisers and their conflicting advice -- Negotiation : Truman and Byrnes at Potsdam -- Intimidation : Hiroshima, the Japanese and the Soviets -- Indecision : floundering between collaboration and confrontation -- Transformation : Truman's foreign policy.
Review: "From Roosevelt to Truman investigates Truman's foreign policy background and examines the legacy that FDR bequeathed to him. After Potsdam and the American use of the atomic bomb, both occurring during Truman's presidency, the United States floundered between collaboration and confrontation with the Soviets. The resolution of this debate represents a turning point in the transformation of American foreign policy. This work reveals that the real departure in American policy came only after the Truman administration had exhausted the legitimate possibilities of the Rooseveltian approach of collaboration with the Soviet Union."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E813 .M57 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001907443

Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-367) and index.

Preparation : the making of an (American) internationalist -- Inheritance : Franklin Roosevelt's uncertain legacy -- Initiation : tactical reversal, strategic continuity -- Instruction : Truman's advisers and their conflicting advice -- Negotiation : Truman and Byrnes at Potsdam -- Intimidation : Hiroshima, the Japanese and the Soviets -- Indecision : floundering between collaboration and confrontation -- Transformation : Truman's foreign policy.

"From Roosevelt to Truman investigates Truman's foreign policy background and examines the legacy that FDR bequeathed to him. After Potsdam and the American use of the atomic bomb, both occurring during Truman's presidency, the United States floundered between collaboration and confrontation with the Soviets. The resolution of this debate represents a turning point in the transformation of American foreign policy. This work reveals that the real departure in American policy came only after the Truman administration had exhausted the legitimate possibilities of the Rooseveltian approach of collaboration with the Soviet Union."--Jacket.

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CHOICE Review

Miscamble (Notre Dame Univ.) has written a meticulously detailed book on President Truman and the origins of the Cold War. Based on a plethora of primary and secondary sources, Miscamble's central thesis is that Truman came to the White House determined to follow Franklin Roosevelt's conciliatory approach to the Soviet Union. FDR is criticized for not having briefed Truman on foreign policy matters and having kept his advisers in the dark about his future plans concerning Russia. The author emphasizes his thesis and concludes that "the broad sweep of American policy from April 1945 to the Potsdam conference consisted of a genuine effort to maintain cooperative relations with the Soviet Union." Miscamble cites advisers such as Joseph Davies, Harry Hopkins, and James Byrnes in 1945 and early 1946 as men who supported a conciliatory approach. He argues that even the possession of the atomic bomb did not alter this approach. It was not until late 1946 that Soviet actions, as well as the influence of George Kennan, Clark Clifford, and others persuaded Truman to stand up to Russia. Readers will have to judge how successfully Miscamble has made his argument. Summing Up: Recommended. All collections, from lower-division undergraduates through professionals and practitioners. A. Yarnell Montana State University

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