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The several lives of Joseph Conrad / John Stape.

By: Stape, J. H. (John Henry).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c2007Edition: 1st U.S. ed.Description: xxvii, 369 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781400044498; 1400044499.Subject(s): Conrad, Joseph, 1857-1924Additional physical formats: Online version:: Several lives of Joseph Conrad.; Online version:: Several lives of Joseph Conrad.DDC classification: 823/.912
Contents:
'Pole-Catholic and gentleman' (1857-1878) -- 'Tell me the sea': apprentice, mate, and master (1878-1890) -- Crisis: finding a home (1890-1895) -- Husband and writer (1896-1898) -- 'The fatal partnership': collaborator and friend (1899-1904) -- The analyst of illusions (1905-1909) -- Breakdown and recovery (1910-1914) -- The Englishman (1915-1919) -- 'Smiling public man' (1920-1924).
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR6005 .O4 Z798 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001908110

"Selected bibliography: Conrad": p. 337-338.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 339-353) and index.

'Pole-Catholic and gentleman' (1857-1878) -- 'Tell me the sea': apprentice, mate, and master (1878-1890) -- Crisis: finding a home (1890-1895) -- Husband and writer (1896-1898) -- 'The fatal partnership': collaborator and friend (1899-1904) -- The analyst of illusions (1905-1909) -- Breakdown and recovery (1910-1914) -- The Englishman (1915-1919) -- 'Smiling public man' (1920-1924).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Stape has edited several books on or by Joseph Conrad, best known for writing Heart of Darkness; here, he writes as a self-proclaimed "fourth generation" biographer, i.e., the first to have access to the entirety of Conrad's correspondence as well as the Internet. Despite the book's stated aim of brevity, it nonetheless manages to fit in numerous asides that illuminate the familial, cultural, and historical contexts in which Conrad lived. These observations help ground the author's life and literary works, both of which often elude Stape's analysis. Conrad was notorious for glossing over embarrassing facts and embellishing others in his memoirs and even in conversations with his friends. Stape offers that "compression and dramatic impact rather than strict adherence to the fact" were Conrad's primary aim, so he spends much of his time picking through what little evidence was left behind and debunking what he deems myths propagated by previous biographers. Exhaustively indexed and annotated, this book possesses an authoritativeness that recommends it to academic libraries and public libraries bringing their collections up to date.-Megan Hodge, West End Branch of the Richmond P.L., VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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