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Replacing France : the origins of American intervention in Vietnam / Kathryn C. Statler.

By: Statler, Kathryn C, 1971-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2007Description: xii, 378 p. : map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780813124407 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0813124409 (hardcover : alk. paper).Subject(s): Vietnam -- Politics and government -- 1945-1975 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 | France -- Foreign relations -- 1945- | United States -- Foreign relations -- France | France -- Foreign relations -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Replacing France.; Online version:: Replacing France.DDC classification: 959.704/31
Contents:
Introduction : The Franco-American alliance and Vietnam -- Part 1. Neither communism nor colonialism, 1950-1954. Decolonization and Cold War ; A death in March ; Negotiating toward Geneva -- Part 2. After Geneva, 1954-1956. The Diem experiment ; The non-elections of 1956 ; From the French to the Americans -- Part 3. War by other means, 1956-1960. Maintaining a presence ; Building a colony -- Conclusion : Replacing France.
Review: "Using recently released archival materials from the United States and Europe, Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam explains how and why the United States came to assume control as the dominant western power in Vietnam during the 1950s. Acting on their conviction that American methods had a better chance of building a stable, noncommunist South Vietnamese nation, Eisenhower administration officials systematically ejected French military, economic, political, bureaucratic, and cultural institutions from Vietnam." "Kathryn C. Statler examines diplomatic maneuvers in Paris, Washington, D.C., London, and Saigon to detail how Western alliance members sought to transform South Vietnam into a modern, westernized, and democratic ally but ultimately failed to counter the Communist threat. Abetted by South Vietnamese prime minister Ngo Dinh Diem, Americans in Washington, D.C., and Saigon undermined their French counterparts at every turn, resulting In the disappearance of the French presence by the time Kennedy assumed office." "Although the United States ultimately replaced France in South Vietnam, efforts to build South Vietnam into a nation failed. Instead, it became a dependent client state that was unable to withstand increasing Communist aggression from the North. Replacing France is a fundamental reassessment of the origins of U.S. involvement in Vietnam that explains how Franco-American conflict led the United States to pursue a unilateral and ultimately imperialist policy in Vietnam."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS556.8 .S73 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001907518

Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-368) and index.

Introduction : The Franco-American alliance and Vietnam -- Part 1. Neither communism nor colonialism, 1950-1954. Decolonization and Cold War ; A death in March ; Negotiating toward Geneva -- Part 2. After Geneva, 1954-1956. The Diem experiment ; The non-elections of 1956 ; From the French to the Americans -- Part 3. War by other means, 1956-1960. Maintaining a presence ; Building a colony -- Conclusion : Replacing France.

"Using recently released archival materials from the United States and Europe, Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam explains how and why the United States came to assume control as the dominant western power in Vietnam during the 1950s. Acting on their conviction that American methods had a better chance of building a stable, noncommunist South Vietnamese nation, Eisenhower administration officials systematically ejected French military, economic, political, bureaucratic, and cultural institutions from Vietnam." "Kathryn C. Statler examines diplomatic maneuvers in Paris, Washington, D.C., London, and Saigon to detail how Western alliance members sought to transform South Vietnam into a modern, westernized, and democratic ally but ultimately failed to counter the Communist threat. Abetted by South Vietnamese prime minister Ngo Dinh Diem, Americans in Washington, D.C., and Saigon undermined their French counterparts at every turn, resulting In the disappearance of the French presence by the time Kennedy assumed office." "Although the United States ultimately replaced France in South Vietnam, efforts to build South Vietnam into a nation failed. Instead, it became a dependent client state that was unable to withstand increasing Communist aggression from the North. Replacing France is a fundamental reassessment of the origins of U.S. involvement in Vietnam that explains how Franco-American conflict led the United States to pursue a unilateral and ultimately imperialist policy in Vietnam."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Making extensive use of French sources, Statler (Univ. of South Dakota) examines the role that the Franco-American alliance played in the US intervention in Vietnam in the 1950s. She convincingly argues that the inability of France and the US to agree on a common policy in Indochina and against the communist threat in general caused the US to replace France as the major Western power in Vietnam. But the US, despite its resolve to nation-build, succeeded, in her view, in simply replacing the colonialism of the French with a neocolonial policy of its own. Statler's contention that intra-alliance politics played as much of a role as anticommunism in US policy is a welcome addition to the study of the US role in Vietnam, and her account of the US use of cultural weapons is innovative. But the author occasionally weakens her case with speculation that goes too far beyond the evidence, and with a concluding attack on John Foster Dulles's "villainy" that contradicts the transnational analysis that precedes it. Nonetheless, this is a worthwhile contribution to the literature. Summing Up: Recommended. All college and university libraries. L. M. Lees Old Dominion University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Kathryn C. Statler is associate professor of history at the University of San Diego and coeditor of The Eisenhower Administration, the Third World, and the Globalization of the Cold War.</p>

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