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Nixon and Kissinger : partners in power / Robert Dallek.

By: Dallek, Robert.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : HarperCollins Pub., c2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: xii, 740 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0060722304 (acid-free paper); 9780060722302 (acid-free paper); 9780060722319 (pbk.); 0060722312 (pbk.).Subject(s): Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994 | Kissinger, Henry, 1923- | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Statesmen -- United States -- Biography | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989DDC classification: 973.924092/2 | B
Contents:
Brethren of a kind. -- Nixon -- Kissinger -- 1968 -- limits of power. -- Nixon-Kissinger White House -- Hope and illusion -- politics of foreign policy -- Troubles galore -- Crisis managers -- Winter of discontent -- best of times. -- road to détente -- Détente in Asia: gains and losses -- warriors as peacemakers -- Tainted victories -- worst of times. -- New miseries -- In the shadow of Watergate -- Nixon-Kissinger presidency -- end of a presidency.
Summary: Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger were two of the most compelling, contradictory, and important leaders in America in the second half of the twentieth century. Both were largely self-made men, brimming with ambition and often ruthless in pursuit of their goals. Tapping into recently disclosed documents and tapes, historian Dallek uncovers fascinating details about Nixon and Kissinger's tumultuous personal relationship -- their collaboration and rivalry -- and the extent to which they struggled to outdo each other in foreign policy achievements. He also analyzes their dealings with power brokers at home and abroad, including the nightmare of Vietnam, the brilliant opening to China, détente with the Soviet Union, the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East, the disastrous overthrow of Allende in Chile, and growing tensions between India and Pakistan, while recognizing how both men were continually plotting to distract the American public's attention away from the growing scandal of Watergate.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E856 .D35 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001907476

Includes bibliographical references (p. [697]-700) and index.

pt. 1. Brethren of a kind. -- Nixon -- Kissinger -- 1968 -- pt. 2. The limits of power. -- The Nixon-Kissinger White House -- Hope and illusion -- The politics of foreign policy -- Troubles galore -- Crisis managers -- Winter of discontent -- pt. 3. The best of times. -- The road to détente -- Détente in Asia: gains and losses -- The warriors as peacemakers -- Tainted victories -- pt. 4. The worst of times. -- New miseries -- In the shadow of Watergate -- The Nixon-Kissinger presidency -- The end of a presidency.

Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger were two of the most compelling, contradictory, and important leaders in America in the second half of the twentieth century. Both were largely self-made men, brimming with ambition and often ruthless in pursuit of their goals. Tapping into recently disclosed documents and tapes, historian Dallek uncovers fascinating details about Nixon and Kissinger's tumultuous personal relationship -- their collaboration and rivalry -- and the extent to which they struggled to outdo each other in foreign policy achievements. He also analyzes their dealings with power brokers at home and abroad, including the nightmare of Vietnam, the brilliant opening to China, détente with the Soviet Union, the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East, the disastrous overthrow of Allende in Chile, and growing tensions between India and Pakistan, while recognizing how both men were continually plotting to distract the American public's attention away from the growing scandal of Watergate.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Dallek, the author of such first-rate biographies as An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963, now offers an excellent reassessment of one of the most imposing foreign policy duos in U.S. history. Nixon and Kissinger both reveled in power and were driven by the hope of attaining greatness, expectations that were shattered in part by their mutual arrogance, cynicism, and need for constant reassurance. The author maintains that their partnership achieved important victories, notably the opening of China, detente with the Soviet Union, and Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy, which ended the 1973 Yom Kippur War at a time when Nixon was consumed by Watergate. However, such failures as the disastrous policies in Vietnam and Cambodia, which resulted in thousands of American and millions of Asian deaths; the toppling of the legitimately elected Allende government in Chile; and the willingness to use foreign policy as a means to secure Nixon's reelection and to downplay Watergate damaged America's reputation for decades. Both men spent the post-Nixon years writing many popular books--16 between them--in attempts to rehabilitate or enhance their reputations. Dallek's is an important analysis, based on recently available declassified records and includes important caveats for current policy makers. Highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 2/15/07.]--Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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