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The radical Jack London : writings on war and revolution / edited and with an introduction and notes by Jonah Raskin.

By: London, Jack, 1876-1916.
Contributor(s): Raskin, Jonah, 1942-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008Description: xi, 285 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780520255456 (cloth : alk. paper); 0520255453 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780520255463 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0520255461 (pbk. : alk. paper).Other title: Writings on war and revolution.Uniform titles: Selections. 2008 Subject(s): London, Jack, 1876-1916 -- Criticism and interpretation | Socialism | Revolutions in literature | War in literatureDDC classification: 813/.52 LOC classification: PS3523.O46 | A6 2008
Contents:
List of illustrations -- Introduction: Jack London: the Orphan at the abyss -- Part 1: Boy Socialist, 1895-1899 -- Pessimism, optimism and patriotism -- What socialism is -- Voters' voice -- Socialistic views -- Road -- Question of the maximum -- Part 2: Comrade White Man, 1900-1905 -- Economics of the Klondike -- Incarnation of push and go -- Salt of the Earth -- People of the Abyss, chapter 1: Descent -- How I became a socialist -- What shall be done with this boy? -- Japanese officers consider everything a military secret -- Revolution -- Part 3: Apostate Revolutionary, 1906-1912 -- Apostate -- Something rotten in Idaho: the table of the conspiracy against Moyer, Pettibone and Haywood -- Pen -- Iron heel, chapter 23 -- Martin Eden, chapter 46 -- If Japan wakens China -- Burning daylight, part II, chapter 8 -- War -- Introduction to Alexander Berkman's Prison memoirs of an anarchist -- Part 4: Cosmic Voyager, 1913-1916 -- John Barleycorn: Alcoholic memoirs, chapter 36 -- Star rover, chapter 22 -- Letter of resignation from the socialist party -- Of man of the future -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- For classroom discussion -- Index.
Summary: From the Publisher:" "Big things are happening secretly all around," says Jack London's prescient hero Ernest Everhard in the 1908 novel The Iron Heel, excerpted in this timely anthology of London's writings about war and revolution. Besides illuminating his surprising literary range, The Radical Jack London establishes the iconic American author as both a product of his own era and a significant voice for ours. The book features works by London that have been unavailable for decades. In his insightful introduction, editor Jonah Raskin lays out the social, economic, and political contexts for London's polemical writings and shows London to be America's leading revolutionary writer at the turn of the twentieth century.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3523 .O46 A6 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001908029

Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-269) and index.

List of illustrations -- Introduction: Jack London: the Orphan at the abyss -- Part 1: Boy Socialist, 1895-1899 -- Pessimism, optimism and patriotism -- What socialism is -- Voters' voice -- Socialistic views -- Road -- Question of the maximum -- Part 2: Comrade White Man, 1900-1905 -- Economics of the Klondike -- Incarnation of push and go -- Salt of the Earth -- People of the Abyss, chapter 1: Descent -- How I became a socialist -- What shall be done with this boy? -- Japanese officers consider everything a military secret -- Revolution -- Part 3: Apostate Revolutionary, 1906-1912 -- Apostate -- Something rotten in Idaho: the table of the conspiracy against Moyer, Pettibone and Haywood -- Pen -- Iron heel, chapter 23 -- Martin Eden, chapter 46 -- If Japan wakens China -- Burning daylight, part II, chapter 8 -- War -- Introduction to Alexander Berkman's Prison memoirs of an anarchist -- Part 4: Cosmic Voyager, 1913-1916 -- John Barleycorn: Alcoholic memoirs, chapter 36 -- Star rover, chapter 22 -- Letter of resignation from the socialist party -- Of man of the future -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- For classroom discussion -- Index.

From the Publisher:" "Big things are happening secretly all around," says Jack London's prescient hero Ernest Everhard in the 1908 novel The Iron Heel, excerpted in this timely anthology of London's writings about war and revolution. Besides illuminating his surprising literary range, The Radical Jack London establishes the iconic American author as both a product of his own era and a significant voice for ours. The book features works by London that have been unavailable for decades. In his insightful introduction, editor Jonah Raskin lays out the social, economic, and political contexts for London's polemical writings and shows London to be America's leading revolutionary writer at the turn of the twentieth century.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Editor Raskin (American Scream: Allen Ginsberg's Howl and the Making of the Beat Generation) presents both a biography of Jack London (1876-1916) and a chronology of 27 of his rare and noteworthy short stories, speeches, novel excerpts, and journalistic endeavors. London is thought to have influenced Beat Generation authors such as Jack Kerouac; he is considered a precursor to progressive journalists Norman Mailer and Tom Wolf and has even been stylistically compared with Edgar Allan Poe. While most know him for his book about the life of a dog, The Call of the Wild, readers are here given the opportunity to explore London's full spectrum of visionary passions, from his earliest writings as a "boy socialist" to those preceding his demise at the hands of depression and alcohol. London writes quite prophetically about race, class war, countries at war, health care, censorship, and rapidly advancing communication methods, tackling many issues with which society today still struggles. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.-David L. Reynolds, Cleveland P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The vast majority of these 24 pieces were not included in The Portable Jack London, ed. by Earle Labor (CH, Jan'95, 32-2582), and none of them was in the Library of America's Jack London, ed. by Donald Pizer (1982). Indeed, the last noteworthy collection of London's radical thought was Jack London: American Rebel, ed. by Philip Foner (1947). Each of the pieces included here (among them one that first appeared in Pravda) plays a part in the evolution and development of London's personal and socialistic ideology (a point served by the chronological arrangement). Raskin (Sonoma State Univ.) does not shy away from accusations of racism against London: he includes "Salt of the Earth," 1902, and "If Japan Awakens China," 1909, which present London at his most jingoistic and Anglo-Saxon. Since some of London's key full-length works --e.g., John Barleycorn and The People of the Abyss--have been largely unavailable, researchers will welcome their inclusion. The collection concludes with London's letter of resignation from the Socialist Labour Party (1916) shortly before he committed suicide. Raskin provides excellent introductions, to both the book as a whole and each passage. The bibliography more than satisfies, but it purposely omits London's total oeuvre. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers, all levels. A. Hirsh emeritus, Central Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

One of the pioneers of 20th century American literature, Jack London specialized in tales of adventure inspired by his own experiences. <p> London was born in San Francisco in 1876. At 14, he quit school and became an "oyster pirate," robbing oyster beds to sell his booty to the bars and restaurants in Oakland. Later, he turned on his pirate associates and joined the local Fish Patrol, resulting in some hair-raising waterfront battles. Other youthful activities included sailing on a seal-hunting ship, traveling the United States as a railroad tramp, a jail term for vagrancy and a hazardous winter in the Klondike during the 1897 gold rush. Those experiences converted him to socialism, as he educated himself through prolific reading and began to write fiction. <p> After a struggling apprenticeship, London hit literary paydirt by combining memories of his adventures with Darwinian and Spencerian evolutionary theory, the Nietzchean concept of the "superman" and a Kipling-influenced narrative style. "The Son of the Wolf"(1900) was his first popular success, followed by 'The Call of the Wild" (1903), "The Sea-Wolf" (1904) and "White Fang" (1906). He also wrote nonfiction, including reportage of the Russo-Japanese War and Mexican revolution, as well as "The Cruise of the Snark" (1911), an account of an eventful South Pacific sea voyage with his wife, Charmian, and a rather motley crew. <p> London's body broke down prematurely from his rugged lifestyle and hard drinking, and he died of uremic poisoning - possibly helped along by a morphine overdose - at his California ranch in 1916. Though his massive output is uneven, his best works - particularly "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang" - have endured because of their rich subject matter and vigorous prose. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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