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Funding extended conflicts : Korea, Vietnam, and the War on Terror / Richard M. Miller, Jr. ; foreword by Dov Zakheim.

By: Miller, Richard M, 1967-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Westport, Conn. : Praeger Security International, 2007Description: xviii, 179 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780275998967 (alk. paper); 0275998967 (alk. paper).Subject(s): War -- Economic aspects -- United States | Korean War, 1950-1953 -- Economic aspects -- United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Economic aspects -- United States | War on Terrorism, 2001-2009 -- Economic aspectsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Funding extended conflicts.DDC classification: 355.6/220973
Contents:
Introduction -- Cost of war: a frame of reference -- Korean War: fiscal years 1951-1953 -- Vietnam and Southeast Asia: 1965-1975 -- Global War on terror: 2001-? -- Resourcing considerations: enduring lessons and issues from extended conflicts past and present -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC110 .D4 M55 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001909118

Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-173) and index.

Introduction -- Cost of war: a frame of reference -- Korean War: fiscal years 1951-1953 -- Vietnam and Southeast Asia: 1965-1975 -- Global War on terror: 2001-? -- Resourcing considerations: enduring lessons and issues from extended conflicts past and present -- Conclusion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a major contribution to the study of US war expenditures. Miller (US Navy) examines US funding of three wars: Korea, Vietnam, and the global war on terror. For each he covers cost estimates and appropriation, allocation, and spending. He tries to place the material in context by preceding each introduction with a caption from a prominent source. Miller clearly explains the funding process in each case study and raises many questions, which he answers with healthy cynicism. One conclusion is that all estimates depend on assumptions; hence, they all end up wrong. Supplemental funding has been significant, incremental, and expensive in terms of opportunity costs. In discussing resources, Miller considers 12 serious issues including cost estimates, transition from supplemental to baseline budgets, advantages and disadvantages of supplemental budgeting, benefits and durability of flexible appropriations, importance of authorities relative to funding, cost components, overtime, predisposed outlook of the political leaders, congressional activism, and tensions and suspicions surrounding war expenditures. This volume would be more valuable had the author addressed opportunity costs of these expenditures in more detail. Charts, tables, glossary, footnotes, plus introductions and summaries of chapters and sections enrich the text. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate students through professionals. E. H. Tuma emeritus, University of California, Davis

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Richard M. Miller Jr. , is a serving officer in the U.S. Navy with extensive background in budget issues who most recently worked as a congressional analyst for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A distinguished graduate of the National War College and the Naval War College, Commander Miller is a winner of the B. Franklin Reinauer Defense Economics Prize. In addition, he was a Federal Executive Fellow in the Institute for the Study of Conflict, Ideology, and Policy at Boston University.</p>

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