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A godly hero : the life of William Jennings Bryan / Michael Kazin.

By: Kazin, Michael, 1948-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Knopf , 2006Edition: 1st ed.Description: 374 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0375411356; 9780375411359.Other title: Life of William Jennings Bryan.Subject(s): Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925 | Politicians -- United States -- Biography | Statesmen -- United States -- Biography | United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1933 | Populism -- United States -- History | Democratic Party (U.S.) -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Godly hero.DDC classification: 973.91/092 | B
Contents:
The romance of Jefferson and Jesus -- Education of a hero, 1860-1890 -- Speaker in the house, 1891-1894 -- In the armor of a righteous cause, 1895-1896 -- A republic, not an empire, 1897-1900 -- I have kept the faith, 1901-1904 -- Prophet on the road -- The ordeal of reform, 1906-1908 -- Conscience of the party, 1909-1912 -- Bryan's people -- Moralist at state, 1913-1915 -- Moralist in retreat, 1916-1919 -- Save the children, 1920-1925 -- The fate of a Christian liberal.
Summary: A portrait of the American orator describes his unique role as a leader of the Christian left and his seminal place in both American politics and religion in the volatile political landscape of turn-of-the-century America.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E664 .B87 K39 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001908433

Includes bibliographical references (p. 307-366) and index.

The romance of Jefferson and Jesus -- Education of a hero, 1860-1890 -- Speaker in the house, 1891-1894 -- In the armor of a righteous cause, 1895-1896 -- A republic, not an empire, 1897-1900 -- I have kept the faith, 1901-1904 -- Prophet on the road -- The ordeal of reform, 1906-1908 -- Conscience of the party, 1909-1912 -- Bryan's people -- Moralist at state, 1913-1915 -- Moralist in retreat, 1916-1919 -- Save the children, 1920-1925 -- The fate of a Christian liberal.

A portrait of the American orator describes his unique role as a leader of the Christian left and his seminal place in both American politics and religion in the volatile political landscape of turn-of-the-century America.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Kazin (history, Georgetown Univ.; The Populist Persuasion: An American History) places the "Great Commoner" squarely in the context of his times. Bryan (1860-1925) was both a religious man and a very political man, at home teaching Bible classes or railing against tariffs. His Christianity stressed charity and social justice, and his campaigns were always more crusades than mere political contests. Bryan changed presidential politics by barnstorming in his own three presidential campaigns as well as for later Democratic nominees. His reformist ideas turned the Democrats toward progressivism and reform, which culminated in such measures as the popular election of U.S. senators and votes for women as well as many other hallmarks of the presidencies of Wilson and FDR. Kazin pulls no punches: Bryan defended Jim Crow laws passed by Democrats in the South and used gunboat diplomacy when he was secretary of state under Wilson. Though Bryan was quick to invoke religion in his causes and, as a fundamentalist, aided the prosecution in the 1925 Scopes trial, he was nothing like the champion of Babbitry that historians and Hollywood have heretofore made him out to be. Strongly recommended for public and academic libraries.-Duncan Stewart, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

A three-time loser for the presidency and a committed Christian for whom Jefferson and the Bible were political guideposts, Bryan has for decades seemed deader than dead. Kazin (Georgetown Univ.) thinks otherwise. In this exhaustively researched biography, Kazin describes Bryan as the idea man and voice of the democracy, inveighing against Wall Street, imperialism, and the trusts. Kazin describes Bryan's impressive oratorical skills, his rapid raise in politics, and his nearly constant campaigning through good and bad years for his party. Along with Woodrow Wilson, Bryan served as the bridge between the laissez-faire party of Grover Cleveland and the activist democracy of Franklin D. Roosevelt. In some respects, Bryan was a Wilsonian without the sanctimony, but also without the savvy that enabled Wilson to govern effectively until the League of Nations struggle. Sympathetic to Bryan, even in his final phase as a foe of the teaching of evolution in the public schools, Kazin nonetheless relates his subject's unwillingness to challenge white supremacy and his inability to compromise, notably during a rocky tenure as Wilson's secretary of state. This is a model biography with a political kick: a tangible reminder that religious conviction and a politically progressive outlook are compatible. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. J. Birkner Gettysburg College

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