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Baldwin's Harlem : a biography of James Baldwin / Herb Boyd.

By: Boyd, Herb, 1938-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Atria Books, 2008Edition: 1st Atria Books hardcover ed.Description: xxvii, 244 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780743293075; 074329307X.Subject(s): Baldwin, James, 1924-1987 | Authors, American -- 20th century -- Biography | African American authors -- Biography | Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- Intellectual life -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Baldwin's Harlem.; Online version:: Baldwin's Harlem.DDC classification: 818/.5409 | B
Contents:
Born in Harlem -- Encountering Countee Cullen -- Langston Hughes -- Sanctuary -- Death in Harlem -- Malcolm X -- The Harlem Six -- The Jewish question -- Harlem, real and imagined -- Cruse's crisis -- Baraka.
Summary: A portrait of the iconic author offers insight into Baldwin's connection to the city of Harlem, from his relationship with poet laureate Countee Cullen and student writings at Frederick Douglass Junior High to his diverse views on Harlem's community life.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3552 .A45 Z7597 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001911353

Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-233) and index.

Born in Harlem -- Encountering Countee Cullen -- Langston Hughes -- Sanctuary -- Death in Harlem -- Malcolm X -- The Harlem Six -- The Jewish question -- Harlem, real and imagined -- Cruse's crisis -- Baraka.

A portrait of the iconic author offers insight into Baldwin's connection to the city of Harlem, from his relationship with poet laureate Countee Cullen and student writings at Frederick Douglass Junior High to his diverse views on Harlem's community life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Born in Harlem in 1924, James Baldwin was raised and educated there at a time when the glories of the Harlem Renaissance were giving way to the dark days of the Great Depression. In his latest effort, prolific writer and journalist Boyd (Harlem Reader) focuses on the powerful role Harlem played in Baldwin's life and work. He traces the influence of Countee Cullen, who taught Baldwin French in junior high school, and of literary models like Richard Wright and Langston Hughes. He explores Baldwin's call to the pulpit, his religious crisis, his coming to terms with his homosexuality, and his responses to the Civil Rights Movement, black nationalism, and the conflicts between Jews and blacks in Harlem. Throughout, he defends Baldwin against his detractors, particularly the self-proclaimed gadfly Harold Cruse. Boyd's interviews with Michael Thelwell (Univ. of Massachusetts) and Quincy Troup round out the volume. Given its narrow scope, this work will probably appeal most to readers already familiar with Baldwin. Those new to the author's life and work may want the broader context provided by David Leeming's James Baldwin: A Biography or William Weatherby's James Baldwin: Artist on Fire. Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.-William Gargan, Brooklyn Coll. Lib., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

One can find several excellent (if now somewhat dated) biographies of James Baldwin, one of the most significant figures in African American letters of the past 60 years--for example, eponymous works by David Leeming (CH, Oct'94, 32-0754) and W. J. Weatherby (1989) and James Campbell's Talking at the Gates (CH, Dec'91, 29-1947). Those looking for a full introduction to Baldwin's life would still begin with these fine works. Boyd does not aim for a conventional biography, and he barely touches such important topics as Baldwin's complex relationships with his stepfather and his mentors Richard Wright and Beauford Delaney. Instead, he fills in some significant gaps in the narrative of Baldwin's life, including his connections with Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, Harold Cruse, and Amiri Baraka, all in the context of Baldwin's ties to Harlem. An authoritative guide to Harlem (he edited The Harlem Reader, 2003), Boyd is on solid ground. He not only describes the lifelong impact of Harlem on Baldwin's psyche but also provides two informative interviews he had with Michael Thelwell and Quincy Troupe, fellow authors and friends of Baldwin. This readable book will enlighten and delight anyone interested in American and/or African American literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. L. J. Parascandola Long Island University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Herb Boyd teaches at the College of New Rochelle & New York University. He lives in New York City. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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