Normal view MARC view ISBD view

State of rebellion : reconstruction in South Carolina / Richard Zuczek.

By: Zuczek, Richard, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Columbia, S.C. : University of South Carolina Press, c1996Description: xi, 250 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1570031053; 9781570031052.Subject(s): South Carolina -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- South CarolinaDDC classification: 975.704 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Conservative reconstruction -- The battle is joined--again -- "We must fight the devil with fire" -- Divide and conquer -- "A perfect reign of terror" -- Truce and consequences -- The tide turns -- "It is in every sense a military campaign" -- The revolution of '76.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F274 .Z83 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001911452

Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-227) and index.

Conservative reconstruction -- The battle is joined--again -- "We must fight the devil with fire" -- Divide and conquer -- "A perfect reign of terror" -- Truce and consequences -- The tide turns -- "It is in every sense a military campaign" -- The revolution of '76.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Zuczek's book is essentially a narrative of the political history of Reconstruction in South Carolina from 1865 to 1877. Zuczek believes that the great goal of the South in the Civil War was not the independence of the Confederate nation but rather the protection of southern institutions and social arrangements, particularly the racial order, from outside interference. With the war lost, Reconstruction became another opportunity for white South Carolinians to achieve the same goal. Zuczek argues that with their carefully planned efforts and quasi-military arrangements they made Reconstruction a continuation of the war and in 1877, they won. There is a certain plausibility to this argument, but the author pushes his point quite hard and, among other things, assumes a unity of purpose and coherent leadership that are hard to demonstrate. Although a succinct narrative of the tangled history of the state is valuable, other works--such as Joel Williamson's After Slavery: The Negro in South Carolina during Reconstruction (1965) and Thomas Holt's Black over White: Negro Political Leadership in South Carolina during Reconstruction (CH, Jan'78)--convey more of the complexity and ambiguity of the time. Francis B. Simkins and Robert H. Woody's South Carolina during Reconstruction (1932) remains an indispensable source for social and economic developments. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. M. Matthews; Georgia State University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.