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High-speed dreams : NASA and the technopolitics of supersonic transportation, 1945-1999 / Erik M. Conway.

By: Conway, Erik M, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: New series in NASA history: Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005Description: xvii, 369 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 080188067X (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780801880674 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780801890819 (pbk.); 0801890810 (pbk.).Subject(s): Supersonic transport planes -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration -- Research -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: High-speed dreams.DDC classification: 387.7/3349 Also issued online.
Contents:
Constructing the supersonic age -- Technological rivalry and the Cold War -- Engineering the national champion -- Of noise, jumbos, and SSTs -- Of ozone, the Concorde, and SSTs -- The Airbus, the Orient Express, and the renaissance of speed -- Towards a green SST -- Sic transit HSCT.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
TL685.7 .C695 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001931484

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Constructing the supersonic age -- Technological rivalry and the Cold War -- Engineering the national champion -- Of noise, jumbos, and SSTs -- Of ozone, the Concorde, and SSTs -- The Airbus, the Orient Express, and the renaissance of speed -- Towards a green SST -- Sic transit HSCT.

Also issued online.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Conway has given us a scholarly, detailed study of the scientific, technological, economic, political, and environmental aspects of the attempts to achieve commercially viable supersonic transport aircraft during the last half of the 20th century. The Anglo-French and Soviet types of this technology demonstrated that such aircraft were technologically feasible but were economic failures. The author makes it clear that many, perhaps most, of the actors in the story were driven by a concern for the "politics of prestige." Otherwise it would be difficult to understand why, when such vast resources were expended, so many efforts were likely to fail due to the inability to reach economic, environmenta1, and other goals. These failures were not due to incompetence. American attempts never went so far as to waste resources on production of such chimerical dreams. Not all dreams can be achieved. This fine volume will be of interest to historians and social scientists concerned with the politics and economics of public policy, as well as the general reader willing to work through an important book on a fascinating topic. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels. M. Levinson formerly, University of Washington

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Erik M. Conway serves as historian, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

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