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The most noble adventure : the Marshall plan and the time when America helped save Europe / Greg Behrman.

By: Behrman, Greg, 1976-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Free Press, 2007Edition: 1st Free Press hardcover ed.Description: xi, 448 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780743282635 (hard cover); 0743282639 (hard cover).Subject(s): Marshall Plan | Economic assistance, American -- Europe -- History | Europe -- Economic conditions -- 1945-Additional physical formats: Online version:: Most noble adventure.DDC classification: 338.91/730409044
Contents:
The march to Moscow -- The general's last stand -- The drumbeat at State -- The world responds -- "Friendly aid" in Paris -- Selling America -- Putting it over -- Aid flows -- Springtime in Paris -- The road to recovery -- Shifting gears -- Integration and subterranean fires -- Europe refashioned -- Shutting it down.
Summary: Traces America's four-year diplomatic efforts to help rebuild post-World War II Europe, an endeavor that involved a thirteen-billion-dollar plan and was heavily influenced by political factors.Summary: When World War II ended, Europe lay in ruins. Tens of millions had been killed. Ancient cities had been demolished. The economic, financial and commercial foundations of Europe were in shambles. Western Europe's Communist parties--feeding off want and despair--were flourishing as Stalin's Soviet Union emerged as the sole superpower on the continent. The Marshall Plan was a four-year, $13 billion (more than $100 billion in today's dollars) plan to provide assistance for Europe's economic recovery. More than an aid program, it sought to modernize Western Europe's economies and launch them on a path to prosperity and integration; to restore Western Europe's faith in democracy and capitalism; to enmesh the region firmly in a Western economic association and eventually a military alliance. It was the linchpin of America's strategy to meet the Soviet threat. It helped to trigger the Cold War and, eventually, to win it. Author Behrman brings this vital and dramatic epoch to life and animates the personalities that shaped it.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC240 .B384 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001927706

Includes bibliographical references (p. 413-425) and index.

The march to Moscow -- The general's last stand -- The drumbeat at State -- The world responds -- "Friendly aid" in Paris -- Selling America -- Putting it over -- Aid flows -- Springtime in Paris -- The road to recovery -- Shifting gears -- Integration and subterranean fires -- Europe refashioned -- Shutting it down.

Traces America's four-year diplomatic efforts to help rebuild post-World War II Europe, an endeavor that involved a thirteen-billion-dollar plan and was heavily influenced by political factors.

When World War II ended, Europe lay in ruins. Tens of millions had been killed. Ancient cities had been demolished. The economic, financial and commercial foundations of Europe were in shambles. Western Europe's Communist parties--feeding off want and despair--were flourishing as Stalin's Soviet Union emerged as the sole superpower on the continent. The Marshall Plan was a four-year, $13 billion (more than $100 billion in today's dollars) plan to provide assistance for Europe's economic recovery. More than an aid program, it sought to modernize Western Europe's economies and launch them on a path to prosperity and integration; to restore Western Europe's faith in democracy and capitalism; to enmesh the region firmly in a Western economic association and eventually a military alliance. It was the linchpin of America's strategy to meet the Soviet threat. It helped to trigger the Cold War and, eventually, to win it. Author Behrman brings this vital and dramatic epoch to life and animates the personalities that shaped it.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Behrman (Aspen Institute) has written an excellent, one-volume narrative of the Marshall Plan and the major players who advocated US intervention in post-WW II Europe. European nations were hurting economically and unstable politically, lacking the resources to purchase US-made goods. By 1947, the US had already poured billions of dollars into relief and recovery programs. However, Secretary of State George Marshall was committed to restoring Europe's sagging economy so that democratic institutions could thrive in the face of Soviet expansion. The author focuses on Marshall and his array of visionary subordinates, notably George Kennan, William L. Clayton, Paul Hoffman, and W. Averell Harriman. Behrman argues that these men understood quite well the importance of European recovery, creating a unified, self-sustaining Europe, and converting Germany into an ally. The author devotes considerable attention to the behind-the-scenes workings of Marshall and his ability to garner support for the plan from Congress. This reviewer is pleased with Behrman's impressive research and his ability to explain a very complex story in a cogent manner. Potential instructors should seriously consider this work, which demonstrates the importance of the US role in shaping the postwar world. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. B. Cook North Greenville University

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