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No simple victory : World War II in Europe, 1939-1945 / Norman Davies.

By: Davies, Norman, 1939-.
Contributor(s): Davies, Norman, 1939-. Europe at War.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Viking, 2007Edition: 1st American ed.Description: ix, 544 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780670018321; 0670018325.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Europe | Europe -- History -- 1918-1945Additional physical formats: Online version:: No simple victory.DDC classification: 940.53/4
Contents:
Interpretation : five factors -- Warfare : military action in Europe, 1939-1945 -- Politics : before, during, and after the war -- Soldiers : from enlistment to war grave -- Civilians : life and death in wartime -- Portrayals : the Second World War in pictures, literature and history.
Summary: A leading historian re-examines World War II and its outcome. Davies asks readers to reconsider what they know about World War II, and how the received wisdom might be biased or incorrect. He poses simple questions that have complicated and unexpected answers. For instance, Can you name the five biggest battles of the war in Europe? Or, What were the main political ideologies that were contending for supremacy? The answers to these and other questions--and the implications of those answers--will surprise even those who feel that they are experts on the subject.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D743 .D33 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001929793

"Published in Great Britain as Europe at War 1939-1945 : no simple victory by Macmillan"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [491]-508) and index.

A leading historian re-examines World War II and its outcome. Davies asks readers to reconsider what they know about World War II, and how the received wisdom might be biased or incorrect. He poses simple questions that have complicated and unexpected answers. For instance, Can you name the five biggest battles of the war in Europe? Or, What were the main political ideologies that were contending for supremacy? The answers to these and other questions--and the implications of those answers--will surprise even those who feel that they are experts on the subject.--From publisher description.

Interpretation : five factors -- Warfare : military action in Europe, 1939-1945 -- Politics : before, during, and after the war -- Soldiers : from enlistment to war grave -- Civilians : life and death in wartime -- Portrayals : the Second World War in pictures, literature and history.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Davies, Norman. No Simple Victory; World War II in Europe, 1939-1945. Viking. Sept. 2007. 544p. photogs. maps. index. ISBN 978-0-670-01832-1. $30. Davies (Supernumerary Fellow, Wolfson Coll., Oxford; Rising '44: The Battle of Warsaw) reappraises the war and demolishes many of the myths accreted around it. A lively and contrary historiography, skillfully written and far from humorless, this should be in any subject collection. Where were the seven battles fought that had the most casualties? Americans might know one or two. Hint: all were on the Eastern Front. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

An authority on Polish history, Davies (Univ. of London) argues that in WW II historiography, the Eastern Front deserves primacy and challenges the war's depiction as a great morality play. Asserting that Kursk, not Stalingrad, was the great turning point in Europe because the Soviets broke German offensive power, the author integrates recent accounts of Soviet crimes by Simon Montefiore, Antony Beevor, and Anne Applebaum to argue that WW II was primarily a clash between Nazi and Soviet totalitarianisms, thus clouding the picture of "good" Allies versus "evil" Axis. Davies organizes the redundant chapters with the discussion of causes following the operational history. The author's characterization of Hitler as inveterate gambler owes much to A. J. P. Taylor's discredited thesis. His Holocaust historiography is nearly a decade out of date, and he juxtaposes it with the relatively few studies on the Soviet gulags and other Stalinist crimes in order to imply unconvincingly that historians have chosen to emphasize the former over the latter. While asserting that historians have paid insufficient attention to gathering basic facts before offering partial interpretations of WW II, the book is riddled with errors and trivia. Summing Up: Not recommended. J. R. White University of Maryland University College

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