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The cat, or, how I lost eternity / Jutta Richter ; translated by Anna Brailovsky.

By: Richter, Jutta, 1955-.
Contributor(s): Brailovsky, Anna.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Minneapolis, Minn. : Milkweed Editions, 2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: 63 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781571316769 (hardcover); 1571316760 (hardcover).Other title: Cat | How I lost eternity.Uniform titles: Katze. English Subject(s): Cats -- Juvenile fiction | Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction | Schools -- Juvenile fiction | Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction | Germany -- Juvenile fictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Cat, or, how I lost eternity.DDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.R41544 | Cat 2007Awards: Batchelder Honor Book, 2008.Summary: Eight-year-old Christine is late for school every day because a talking alley cat demands her attention, giving her much to think about as he tries to teach her to be spiteful and pitiless.
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Fiction notes: Click to open in new window Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
R5357CA (Browse shelf) Available 0000001933423

Originally published: Munich : Carl Hanser Verlag, 2006 under the title, Die Katze.

Eight-year-old Christine is late for school every day because a talking alley cat demands her attention, giving her much to think about as he tries to teach her to be spiteful and pitiless.

Batchelder Honor Book, 2008.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-Eight-year-old Christine is late for school every day because she is stopped by a white alley cat that insists on talking to her. They discuss math and loneliness and eternity. While at first Christine feels an affinity with the cat, it later repulses her. The conversations eventually come to an end once Christine stops believing that the feline has anything wise or useful to say to her. It acts the role of The Serpent, trying to lure the Eve-like Christine into doing and being what she knows is not right. There is even a discussion about the Tree of Knowledge and Original Sin at the end to hammer home the point. There is an abundance of unpleasant food imagery (starting with the fish smell that the cat leaves on Christine's hand whenever she touches it), male characters who are either incompetent or unfeeling, and an eclipse that represents the end of the world. It is hard to imagine a broad audience for this book.-Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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