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Hell's cartel : IG Farben and the making of Hitler's war machine / Diarmuid Jeffreys.

By: Jeffreys, Diarmuid.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Metropolitan Books, 2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: viii, 485 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map, ports. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780805078138; 0805078134; 9780805091434; 0805091432.Subject(s): Interessengemeinschaft Farbenindustrie Aktiengesellschaft -- History | Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei | Industrial policy -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Forced labor -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | World War, 1939-1945 -- AtrocitiesDDC classification: 940.53/18134
Contents:
From Perkin's purple to Duisberg's drugs -- The golden years -- The chemist's war -- The birth of a colossus -- Bosch's plan -- Striking the bargain -- Accommodation and collaboration --From long knives to the four year plan -- Preparing for war -- War and profit -- Buna at Auschwitz -- IG Auschwitz and the final solution -- Götterdämmerung -- Preparing the case -- Trial.
Summary: The remarkable rise and shameful fall of one of the twentieth century's greatest conglomerates. At its peak in the 1930s, the German chemical manufacturer IG Farben was one of the most powerful corporations in the world. To this day, companies formerly part of the Farben cartel--aspirin-maker Bayer, graphics supplier Agfa, plastics giant BASF--continue to play key roles in the global market. IG Farben itself, however, is remembered mostly for its connections to the Nazi Party and its complicity in the Holocaust. After the war, Farben's leaders were tried for crimes including mass murder and slave labor. Journalist Jeffreys presents the first comprehensive account of IG Farben's rise and fall, tracing the enterprise from its nineteenth-century origins, when the discovery of synthetic dyes gave rise to a vibrant new industry, through the upheavals of the Great War era, and on to the company's fateful role in World War II.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD9654.9 .I5 J44 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001932433

Includes bibliographical references (p. [455]-467) and index.

From Perkin's purple to Duisberg's drugs -- The golden years -- The chemist's war -- The birth of a colossus -- Bosch's plan -- Striking the bargain -- Accommodation and collaboration --From long knives to the four year plan -- Preparing for war -- War and profit -- Buna at Auschwitz -- IG Auschwitz and the final solution -- Götterdämmerung -- Preparing the case -- Trial.

The remarkable rise and shameful fall of one of the twentieth century's greatest conglomerates. At its peak in the 1930s, the German chemical manufacturer IG Farben was one of the most powerful corporations in the world. To this day, companies formerly part of the Farben cartel--aspirin-maker Bayer, graphics supplier Agfa, plastics giant BASF--continue to play key roles in the global market. IG Farben itself, however, is remembered mostly for its connections to the Nazi Party and its complicity in the Holocaust. After the war, Farben's leaders were tried for crimes including mass murder and slave labor. Journalist Jeffreys presents the first comprehensive account of IG Farben's rise and fall, tracing the enterprise from its nineteenth-century origins, when the discovery of synthetic dyes gave rise to a vibrant new industry, through the upheavals of the Great War era, and on to the company's fateful role in World War II.--From publisher description.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Diarmuid Jeffreys , journalist and documentarian, is the author of Aspirin: The Remarkable Story of a Wonder Drug , which was nominated for the prestigious Aventis Prize for popular science books and chosen as one of the best books of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle . He lives in East Sussex, England.

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