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The race card : how bluffing about bias makes race relations worse / Richard Thompson Ford.

By: Ford, Richard T. (Richard Thompson).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: 388 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780374245757; 0374245754.Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions | Racism -- United States | United States -- Race relations | Malicious accusation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Race card.DDC classification: 305.896/073 Other classification: 86.52 | MS 3530
Contents:
Racism without racists -- The wild card : racism by analogy -- Calling a spade a spade : defining discrimination -- The clash of ends : contested goals -- Post-racism : why the race card is a crisis of success.
Summary: As the label of "prejudice" is applied to more and more situations, it loses a clear and agreed-upon meaning. This makes it easy for self-serving individuals and political hacks to use accusations of racism, sexism, homophobia, and other types of "bias" to advance their own ends. Law professor Ford brings sophisticated legal analysis, lively anecdotes, and plain old common sense to this heated topic, offering ways to separate valid claims from bellyaching. This is a call for us to treat racism as a social problem that must be objectively understood and honestly evaluated.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.86 .F65 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001932565

Includes bibliographical references (p. [363]-372) and index.

Racism without racists -- The wild card : racism by analogy -- Calling a spade a spade : defining discrimination -- The clash of ends : contested goals -- Post-racism : why the race card is a crisis of success.

As the label of "prejudice" is applied to more and more situations, it loses a clear and agreed-upon meaning. This makes it easy for self-serving individuals and political hacks to use accusations of racism, sexism, homophobia, and other types of "bias" to advance their own ends. Law professor Ford brings sophisticated legal analysis, lively anecdotes, and plain old common sense to this heated topic, offering ways to separate valid claims from bellyaching. This is a call for us to treat racism as a social problem that must be objectively understood and honestly evaluated.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This odd book by Stanford law professor Ford is interesting but too often weak in argument and/or dated or incomplete in evidence. It examines numerous accounts of individuals or groups making allegedly faulty claims of racism or bias. Some, e.g., those of Tawana Brawley and O. J. Simpson, are quite old. The middle section includes interesting discussions of racism-by-analogy arguments made by animal rights, gay rights, elderly, and other organizations. Some chapters offer insightful, if uneven, discussions of racial profiling, standardized tests, "reverse racism," and multiculturalism. But examination of Ford's bibliography reveals little use of much relevant social science research, e.g., that of leading housing expert Gregory Squires, or Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, a leading survey researcher whose famous book title Racism without Racists (CH, Jan'04, 41-3121) is the title of Ford's first chapter. For Ford, "almost all Americans agree racism is wrong." Yet recent social science research questions such contentions and provides critical conceptual discussions necessary to make full sense of that statement. Though Ford uses "race card" metaphors, he never analyzes who created and still maintains the "card game" of US racial oppression (slavery, legal segregation, contemporary discrimination), nor does he analyze well with recent social science research racism's still-severe impact on Americans of color. Summing Up: Optional. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. R. Feagin Texas A&M University

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