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America divided : the civil war of the 1960s / Maurice Isserman, Michael Kazin.

By: Isserman, Maurice.
Contributor(s): Kazin, Michael, 1948-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2000Description: x, 358 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0195091906 (acid-free paper); 9780195091908 (acid-free paper); 0195091914 (pbk. : acid-free paper); 9780195091915 (pbk. : acid-free paper).Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1961-1969Additional physical formats: Online version:: America divided.DDC classification: 973.923 LOC classification: E841 | .I87 2000Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Gathering of the forces -- Black ordeal, Black freedom -- The New Frontier of American liberalism -- Why did the United States fight in Vietnam? -- 1963 -- The rise of the Great Society -- 1965 -- The making of a youth culture -- The New Left -- The fall of the Great Society -- The conservative revival -- 1968 -- Many faiths: the '60s reformation -- No cease-fire: 1969-1974 -- Conclusion: winners and losers -- Critical events during the long 1960s.
Summary: A history of the 1960s, discussing the social, cultural, and grassroots political movements that defined the decade, including the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Civil Rights Movement; and providing information about some of the people who spurred the era of change.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E841 .I87 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001423409
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E841 .G54 2006 The presidency of John F. Kennedy / E841 .G57 1993 The sixties : E841 .H25 The best and the brightest / E841 .I87 2000 America divided : E841 .K37 Kennedy and the press; E841 .K374 1978 The Kennedy presidential press conferences / E841 .K458 1988 Robert Kennedy, in his own words :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-313) and index.

Gathering of the forces -- Black ordeal, Black freedom -- The New Frontier of American liberalism -- Why did the United States fight in Vietnam? -- 1963 -- The rise of the Great Society -- 1965 -- The making of a youth culture -- The New Left -- The fall of the Great Society -- The conservative revival -- 1968 -- Many faiths: the '60s reformation -- No cease-fire: 1969-1974 -- Conclusion: winners and losers -- Critical events during the long 1960s.

A history of the 1960s, discussing the social, cultural, and grassroots political movements that defined the decade, including the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Civil Rights Movement; and providing information about some of the people who spurred the era of change.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Isserman (If I Had a Hammer) and Kazin (The Populist Persuasion) are two of the keenest practitioners of the history of American people's politics. Both came of age in the 1960s, and each has a genetic link, respectively, to the Old Left and the grand liberal tradition of the 1930s. No better-suited collaborators could join to offer a history of the American Sixties. But while the book they offer is commendably balanced, the authors have not written a definitive text. Oddly, they cover most penetratingly terrain already well trod by more staid scholars: conventional electoral politics, Vietnam, the four presidencies, the assassinations. Their most important contribution comes in demonstrating the rise not only of a New Left but a new and persistent Right. By contrast, their writing on the advent of the counterculture, movement politics, and especially urban black nationalism is familiar and too brief. The authors seem to be aiming this book at the undergraduate survey-course marketÄeach reference to Jim Crow is accompanied by a parenthetical definitionÄand apparently decided to economize on the very subjects still most unsettled by conventional wisdom. Nevertheless, this is recommended for academic, secondary school, and public libraries.ÄScott H. Silverman, Bryn Mawr Coll. Lib., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Isserman and Kazin's book is the latest entry in the "interpret the '60s sweepstakes," and is an interesting and generally useful addition to the literature. Apparently designed chiefly for undergraduates, it attempts to pull together the varied and often conflicting themes of the period to form a cohesive whole, under the subheading of "civil war." Because only a minority of Americans actually participated in these protests and debates and their behavior was often quite uncivil, Isserman's subtitle is not terribly revealing. What is particularly useful about this book, however, is its largely successful efforts to include all the major topics and issues in one volume. Individual chapters focus on civil rights, liberalism, the war in Vietnam, LBJ's Great Society, youth culture, the New Left, the New Right, and the disintegration of most of these movements and philosophies by the end of the decade. This synthesis forces readers to consider the '60s as a whole, not piecemeal. It ought to be read in conjunction with Robert Buzzanco's Vietnam and the Transformation of American Life (CH, Jun'99), and belongs in every public and undergraduate library. J. Andrew; Franklin and Marshall College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Maurice Isserman is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of History at Hamilton College, and is the author of If I Had a Hammer: The Death of the Old Left and the Birth of the New Left. He lives in upstate New York. Michael Kazin is Professor of History at Georgetown University, and is theauthor of The Populist Persuasion: An American History and Barons of Labor. He lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

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