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Suffragists in an imperial age : U.S. expansion and the woman question, 1870-1929 / Allison L. Sneider.

By: Sneider, Allison L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2008Description: viii, 209 p. : maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195321166; 0195321162; 9780195321166 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0195321162 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780195321173 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0195321170 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Women -- Suffrage -- United States -- History | Suffragists -- United States -- History | United States -- Territorial expansion -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Territorial expansion -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 324.6/230973 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
U.S. expansion and the woman question, 1870-1929 -- Reconstruction and annexation : suffragists in Washington D.C., and Santo Domingo, 1870-1875 -- Western expansion and the politics of federalism : Indians, Mormons, and territorial statehood, 1878-1887 -- Imperial expansion and the problem of Hawaii, 1898-1902 -- Getting suffrage in an age of empire : the Philippines and Puerto Rico, 1914-1929 -- Epilogue.
Summary: "Suffragists in an Imperial Age demonstrates how seemingly disparate conversations about the physical boundaries of national territory and the gendered boundaries of political space overlapped and inflected each other during post-Civil War efforts to rebuild the nation in new terms. This book argues that US expansion was crucial to the development of the post-bellum US woman suffrage movement and shows how federal discussions of citizenship and voting rights in the context of creating territorial governments in the continental West and, after the Spanish-American War, in the Caribbean and the Pacific, created space on the Congressional calendar for suffragists to instigate debate on the woman question. In the negotiation of global power relations across the twentieth century and into the present, political rights for women continues to function as a marker of success for experiments in expanding democracy, as well as a bargaining chip for reasserting some degree of political independence for men. This book shows how by 1929, suffragists were on the verge of making women's voting rights an integral part of US colonial policy, and adding votes for women to the list of markers symbolizing the achievement of "civilization" in US colonies"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JK1896 .S64 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001933969

Includes bibliographical references (p. [135]-193) and index.

U.S. expansion and the woman question, 1870-1929 -- Reconstruction and annexation : suffragists in Washington D.C., and Santo Domingo, 1870-1875 -- Western expansion and the politics of federalism : Indians, Mormons, and territorial statehood, 1878-1887 -- Imperial expansion and the problem of Hawaii, 1898-1902 -- Getting suffrage in an age of empire : the Philippines and Puerto Rico, 1914-1929 -- Epilogue.

"Suffragists in an Imperial Age demonstrates how seemingly disparate conversations about the physical boundaries of national territory and the gendered boundaries of political space overlapped and inflected each other during post-Civil War efforts to rebuild the nation in new terms. This book argues that US expansion was crucial to the development of the post-bellum US woman suffrage movement and shows how federal discussions of citizenship and voting rights in the context of creating territorial governments in the continental West and, after the Spanish-American War, in the Caribbean and the Pacific, created space on the Congressional calendar for suffragists to instigate debate on the woman question. In the negotiation of global power relations across the twentieth century and into the present, political rights for women continues to function as a marker of success for experiments in expanding democracy, as well as a bargaining chip for reasserting some degree of political independence for men. This book shows how by 1929, suffragists were on the verge of making women's voting rights an integral part of US colonial policy, and adding votes for women to the list of markers symbolizing the achievement of "civilization" in US colonies"--Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Beautifully researched and well written, this gem of a book offers a new, frame-shifting look at some of the connections that existed between a series of (seemingly separate) public debates in the US after the Civil War--voting rights for women and US expansionism, both in the West and abroad. Sneider's analysis shows how the history of the US women's movement in this period was inseparable from questions of citizenship, political capacity, political rights, nation building, and what the author calls "national belonging." Her description of the ways in which US expansionism framed and altered both the rhetoric and politics of woman suffrage advocates parallels work done on the importance of colonial ventures for the British suffrage movement, although with different rhetorical and political consequences--most notably, in the flagging support for the political and civil rights of black Americans. In so doing, Sneider (Rice Univ.) not only speaks to a number of scholarly debates, she confirms the degree to which social Darwinist rhetoric permeated and provided coherence among all public debates of the period. A must buy for any library that wants to build or maintain a strong collection in either US history or women's studies. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. N. B. Rosenthal emeritus, SUNY Old Westbury

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Allison L. Sneider, Assistant Professor of History, Rice University.

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