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New women of the new South : the leaders of the woman suffrage movement in the southern states / Marjorie Spruill Wheeler.

By: Spruill, Marjorie Julian, 1951-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1993Description: xxi, 280 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0195075838 (acid-free paper); 9780195075830 (acid-free paper); 0195082451 (pbk. : acid-free paper); 9780195082456 (pbk. : acid-free paper).Subject(s): Suffragists -- Southern States -- History | Women -- Suffrage -- Southern States -- History | Women Suffrage | United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: New women of the new South.DDC classification: 324.6/23/0973 Other classification: 86.52 | 15.87 | 3,6
Contents:
The southern lady: hostage to "the lost cause" -- The making of southern suffragists -- Respectable radicals: southern suffragists as champions of women's rights -- Southern suffragists and "the Negro problem" -- Women's rights and states' rights: dissension in "the solid south" -- Bitter fruit: an incomplete victory, courtesy of Uncle Sam.
Summary: There is currently a great deal of interest in the Southern suffrage movement, but until now historians have had no comprehensive history of the woman suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important new book focuses on eleven of the movement's most prominent leaders at the regional and national levels, exploring the range of opinions within this group, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights. Wheeler argues that the suffragists were motivated primarily by the desire to secure public affirmation of female equality and to protect the interests of women, children, and the poor in the tradition of noblesse oblige in a New South they perceived as misgoverned by crass and materialistic men. A vigorous suffrage movement began in the South in the 1890s, however, because suffragists believed offering woman suffrage as a way of countering black voting strength gave them an "expediency" argument that would succeed - even make the South lead the nation in the adoption of woman suffrage. When this strategy failed, the movement flagged until the Progressive Movement provided a new rationale for female enfranchisement. Wheeler also emphasizes the relationship between the Northern and Southern leaders, which was one of mutual influence. This pioneering study of the Southern suffrage movement will be essential to students of the history of woman suffrage, American women, the South, the Progressive Era, and American reform movements.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JK1896 .W48 1993 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001935717

Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-264) and index.

The southern lady: hostage to "the lost cause" -- The making of southern suffragists -- Respectable radicals: southern suffragists as champions of women's rights -- Southern suffragists and "the Negro problem" -- Women's rights and states' rights: dissension in "the solid south" -- Bitter fruit: an incomplete victory, courtesy of Uncle Sam.

There is currently a great deal of interest in the Southern suffrage movement, but until now historians have had no comprehensive history of the woman suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important new book focuses on eleven of the movement's most prominent leaders at the regional and national levels, exploring the range of opinions within this group, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights. Wheeler argues that the suffragists were motivated primarily by the desire to secure public affirmation of female equality and to protect the interests of women, children, and the poor in the tradition of noblesse oblige in a New South they perceived as misgoverned by crass and materialistic men. A vigorous suffrage movement began in the South in the 1890s, however, because suffragists believed offering woman suffrage as a way of countering black voting strength gave them an "expediency" argument that would succeed - even make the South lead the nation in the adoption of woman suffrage. When this strategy failed, the movement flagged until the Progressive Movement provided a new rationale for female enfranchisement. Wheeler also emphasizes the relationship between the Northern and Southern leaders, which was one of mutual influence. This pioneering study of the Southern suffrage movement will be essential to students of the history of woman suffrage, American women, the South, the Progressive Era, and American reform movements.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The blossoming of women's history has generated numerous case studies of women suffragists and state suffrage campaigns, but overviews have generally focused on the successful national campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment. Now Wheeler (Univ. of Southern Mississippi) presents a regional synthesis of women's suffrage efforts where reform was least popular: the South. Focusing on the lives and ideologies of 11 of the region's leading suffragists, Wheeler explains how these women hoped to exploit white southern males' devotion to racism and states' rights to win votes for women. She explores the difficulties inherent for southern suffragists in trying to be both traditional and pathbreaking, true both to the white South's conservatism and to progressive ideals. Wheeler foreshadows many of the divisions in the postsuffrage women's movement. Her manuscript research is impressive but her analysis stops short of the grassroots suffrage movement, the political situation in many southern states, and the suffrage efforts of African American women. Important for libraries collecting in the South, progressivism, and women's history. Advanced undergraduates and above. P. F. Field; Ohio University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Educated at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the University of Virginia, Marjorie Spruill Wheeler is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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