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Professional pursuits : women and the American arts and crafts movement / Catherine W. Zipf.

By: Zipf, Catherine W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 229 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781572336018 (hardcover : alk. paper); 1572336013.Subject(s): Arts and crafts movement -- United States | Women artists -- United States | Women -- Employment -- United States | Women's rights -- United StatesDDC classification: 305.40973
Contents:
Introduction: opportunities for women -- Woman as architect, Case study: the career of Hazel Wood Waterman -- Woman as inventor, Case study: Mary Louise McLaughlin and ceramic technology -- Woman as executive, Case study: businesswoman Candace Thurber Wheeler -- Woman as editor, Case study: Adelaide Alsop Robineau and the publication of Keramic Studio -- Women and the American arts and crafts movement, Case study: The craftsman, by Irene Sargent -- Conclusion.
Review: "The Victorian era provided few opportunities for women in the professional world. The American Arts and Crafts movement, which began in the late nineteenth century to promote handcraftsmanship over mass production, was a major factor in changing the status of women as professional workers. In Professional Pursuits, Catherine Zipf examines the participation of women in this significant design movement and the role they played in revolutionizing the position of women in the professional world. It also shows how, in turn, the Arts and Crafts movement set the stage for social and political change in future years." "Zipf focuses on five gifted women in various parts of the country. In San Diego, Hazel Wood Waterman parlayed her Arts and Crafts training into a career in architecture. Cincinnati's Mary Louise McLaughlin expanded on her interest in Arts and Crafts pottery by inventing new ceramic technology. New York's Candace Wheeler established four businesses that used Arts and Crafts production to help other women earn a living. In Syracuse, both Adelaide Alsop Robineau and Irene Sargent were responsible for disseminating Arts and Crafts-related information through the movement's publications. Each woman's story is different, but each played an important part in the creation of professional opportunities for women in a male-dominated society." "Professional Pursuits will be of interest to scholars and students of material culture and of the Arts and Crafts movement. More importantly it chronicles a very significant, little-understood aspect of the development of Victorian capitalism: the integration of women into the professional workforce."--BOOK JACKET.
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NK1149.5 .Z57 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001937986

Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-214) and index.

Introduction: opportunities for women -- Woman as architect, Case study: the career of Hazel Wood Waterman -- Woman as inventor, Case study: Mary Louise McLaughlin and ceramic technology -- Woman as executive, Case study: businesswoman Candace Thurber Wheeler -- Woman as editor, Case study: Adelaide Alsop Robineau and the publication of Keramic Studio -- Women and the American arts and crafts movement, Case study: The craftsman, by Irene Sargent -- Conclusion.

"The Victorian era provided few opportunities for women in the professional world. The American Arts and Crafts movement, which began in the late nineteenth century to promote handcraftsmanship over mass production, was a major factor in changing the status of women as professional workers. In Professional Pursuits, Catherine Zipf examines the participation of women in this significant design movement and the role they played in revolutionizing the position of women in the professional world. It also shows how, in turn, the Arts and Crafts movement set the stage for social and political change in future years." "Zipf focuses on five gifted women in various parts of the country. In San Diego, Hazel Wood Waterman parlayed her Arts and Crafts training into a career in architecture. Cincinnati's Mary Louise McLaughlin expanded on her interest in Arts and Crafts pottery by inventing new ceramic technology. New York's Candace Wheeler established four businesses that used Arts and Crafts production to help other women earn a living. In Syracuse, both Adelaide Alsop Robineau and Irene Sargent were responsible for disseminating Arts and Crafts-related information through the movement's publications. Each woman's story is different, but each played an important part in the creation of professional opportunities for women in a male-dominated society." "Professional Pursuits will be of interest to scholars and students of material culture and of the Arts and Crafts movement. More importantly it chronicles a very significant, little-understood aspect of the development of Victorian capitalism: the integration of women into the professional workforce."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Zipf (Salve Regina Univ.) offers a volume of fascinating, important scholarship. Documenting the work of women in design and architecture has been a slow process. Although thousands of women contributed to the development of the design professions in the 19th century, very little of this work has made its way into survey histories. Exclusion has occurred for many reasons, including the often anonymous nature of the work, the tendency to ignore the contributions of female partners (Margaret MacDonald and the Glasgow School come to mind), and copying of the visual canon announced in earlier flawed histories. This book repairs some of that damage. The author engagingly and intelligently explores the careers of five arts and crafts movement women who made significant contributions that should be understood and appreciated. The example of Irene Sargent is illuminating. She was the designer and editor of the hugely influential magazine The Craftsman; however, when the magazine's pages are reproduced in histories, one hears nothing of Sargent or her career. Zipf's book, in documenting the work of five women, makes a beginning. As a model for work that remains to be done, it should be available to all students of visual history and architecture. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. R. M. Labuz Mohawk Valley Community College

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