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The Colored cartoon : Black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954 / Christopher P. Lehman.

By: Lehman, Christopher P.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, c2007Description: 137 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781558496132 (cloth : alk. paper); 1558496130 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Animated films -- United States -- History and criticism | Blacks in motion picturesDDC classification: 791.43/652996073
Contents:
Introduction: The Blackness of animation -- The silent era -- The arrival of sound -- Black characterizations -- Fred "Tex" Avery and "Trickster" animation -- Black representation and World War II political concerns -- African American representation and changing race relations -- United productions and the end of animated Black representation -- Conclusion: The legacy of animated African American expression.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
NC1766 .U5 L442 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001937960
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
NC1766.J3 C53 2006 The anime encyclopedia : NC1766.J3 N36 2005 Anime from Akira to Howl's moving castle : NC1766 .J3 N38 2007 From Impressionism to anime : NC1766 .U5 L442 2007 The Colored cartoon : NC1766.U52 D553 1985 Disney's world : NC1810 .R55 1971B The rise and fall of the poster. NC1845.A7 R5 1968 Posters at the turn of the century.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 123-131) and index.

Introduction: The Blackness of animation -- The silent era -- The arrival of sound -- Black characterizations -- Fred "Tex" Avery and "Trickster" animation -- Black representation and World War II political concerns -- African American representation and changing race relations -- United productions and the end of animated Black representation -- Conclusion: The legacy of animated African American expression.

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CHOICE Review

From their origins in the late-19th century, animation and comic strips were often based on ethnic humor. Lehman (ethnic studies, St. Cloud Univ.) focuses on white animators' visual and sound representations of African Americans and how these changed between 1907 and 1954. Employing careful textual analysis, Lehman detects nuances usually missed as well as blatant racism. He reports that in the 1930s the film industry's strict Production Code not only lowered the length of Betty Boop's dresses but also made sure that no black character would romance or dance close to her for the rest of the series. Lehman's chronological arrangement is well thought out: he shows how animated characterizations of black people were initially rooted in slavery; then, in the 1920s, stereotyped by the black cultural expression of jazz musicians; and, by the 1930s-1940s, associated with animal characters such as Bugs Bunny, who were not identifiably black. Drawing on interviews with top animators, archived scripts, the films themselves, and secondary literature, Lehman's fascinating study is comprehensive, meticulous, and well written. Serious students and researchers, animation fans, and film buffs will find the information in this book invaluable. Summing Up: Essential. All readers, all levels. J. A. Lent Temple University

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