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Speaking of the Moor : from Alcazar to Othello / Emily C. Bartels.

By: Bartels, Emily Carroll.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008Description: viii, 252 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780812240764 (acid-free paper); 0812240766 (acid-free paper); 9780812221015; 081222101X.Subject(s): English drama -- Early modern and Elizabethan, 1500-1600 -- History and criticism | Africa -- In literature | Blacks in literature | Race in literature | Peele, George, 1556-1596. Battle of Alcazar | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Othello | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Titus Andronicus | Lust's dominion; or, The lascivious queen | England -- Race relations -- History -- 16th centuryDDC classification: 822.309355 Other classification: HI 1254 | HI 1250
Contents:
On sitting down to read Othello once again -- Enter Barbary: The battle of Alcazar and 'the World' -- Imperialist beginnings: Hakluyt's Navigations and the place and displacement of Africa -- 'Incorporate in Rome': Titus Andronicus and the consequence of conquest -- Too many blackamoors: deportation, discrimination, and Elizabeth I -- Banishing 'all the Moors': Lust's dominion and the story of Spain -- Cultural traffic: The history and description of Africa and the unmooring of the Moor -- The 'stranger of here and everywhere': Othello and the Moor of Venice.
Review: "In Speaking of the Moor, Emily Bartels sets the early modern Moor plays beside contemporaneous texts that embed Moorish figures within England's historical record - Richard Hakluyt's Principal Navigations, Queen Elizabeth's letters proposing the deportation of England's "blackamoors," and John Pory's translation of The History and Description of Africa. Her book uncovers the surprising complexity of England's negotiation and accommodation of difference at the end of the Elizabethan era."--BOOK JACKET.
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PR658 .A4 B37 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001938588

On sitting down to read Othello once again -- Enter Barbary: The battle of Alcazar and 'the World' -- Imperialist beginnings: Hakluyt's Navigations and the place and displacement of Africa -- 'Incorporate in Rome': Titus Andronicus and the consequence of conquest -- Too many blackamoors: deportation, discrimination, and Elizabeth I -- Banishing 'all the Moors': Lust's dominion and the story of Spain -- Cultural traffic: The history and description of Africa and the unmooring of the Moor -- The 'stranger of here and everywhere': Othello and the Moor of Venice.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [227]-241) and index.

"In Speaking of the Moor, Emily Bartels sets the early modern Moor plays beside contemporaneous texts that embed Moorish figures within England's historical record - Richard Hakluyt's Principal Navigations, Queen Elizabeth's letters proposing the deportation of England's "blackamoors," and John Pory's translation of The History and Description of Africa. Her book uncovers the surprising complexity of England's negotiation and accommodation of difference at the end of the Elizabethan era."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume focuses on four early modern plays featuring Moors as major characters: George Peele's Battle of Alcazar, Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Lust's Dominion (author uncertain), and Shalespeare's Othello. Bartels (Rutgers Univ.) uses the same new historicist methodology that she used in Spectacles of Strangeness (CH, Jan'94, 31-2502), her well-received study of Marlowe's subversive use of "alien" characters (i.e., Oriental despots, Jews, practitioners of black magic, homosexuals). She emphasizes the historical and cultural context of the plays, enriching this approach with chapters focusing on the imperialist vision advocated by Richard Hakluyt's Principal Navigations, letters from Queen Elizabeth urging the deportation of diverse "blackamoors," and John Pory's translation of Leo Africanus's The History and Description of Africa. Demonstrating that the meaning of "Moor" was complex--and not equated simply with African origin, or skin color, or religion--Bartels opens a window onto British relations with Africa at a time when British colonialism and the Atlantic slave trade still lay largely in the future. Well written, with good notes, bibliography, and index, the book belongs in any library supporting the study of early modern literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. B. E. Brandt South Dakota State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Emily C. Bartels is Professor of English at Rutgers University and Associate Director of the Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College. She is author of Spectacles of Strangeness: Imperialism, Alienation, and Marlowe, which also was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press.

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