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Race, space, and riots in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles / Janet L. Abu-lughod.

By: Abu-Lughod, Janet L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007Description: xiv, 344 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780195328752; 0195328752.Subject(s): Race riots -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 20th century | United States -- Race relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Race, space, and riots in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles.DDC classification: 305.896/073
Contents:
An overview of race riots in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles -- The bloody riot of 1919 and its consequences -- The black uprising after King's assassination in 1968 -- The Harlem revolts of 1935 and 1943 -- The Harlem-Bedford Stuyvesant uprising of 1964 -- The Watts rebellion of 1965 : the beginning or the end? -- Riot redux : South Central, 1992 -- Explaining differences, predicting convergence?
Review: "This study is the first attempt to compare six major race riots that occurred in the three largest American urban areas during the course of the twentieth century: in Chicago in 1919 and 1968; in New York in 1935/1943 and 1964; and in Los Angeles in 1965 and 1992. Race, Space, and Riots in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles weaves together detailed narratives of each riot, placing them in their changing historical contexts and showing how urban space, political regimes, and economic conditions - not simply an abstract "race conflict" - have structured the nature and extent of urban rebellions. Building on her previous comparative history of these three cities, Janet Abu-Lughod draws upon archival research, primary sources, case studies, and personal observations to reconstruct events - especially for the 1964 Harlem-Bedford Stuyvesant uprising and Chicago's 1968 riots where no documented studies are available. By focusing on the similarities and differences in each city, identifying the unique and persisting issues, and evaluating the ways political leaders, law enforcement, and the local political culture have either defused or exacerbated urban violence, this book points the way toward alleviating long-standing ethnic and racial tensions." "Race, Space, and Riots In Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles offers a deeper understanding of past - and future - urban race relations while emphasizing that until persistent racial and economic inequalities are meaningfully resolved, the tensions leading to racial violence will continue to exist in America's cities and betray our professed democratic values."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV6477 .A38 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001937499
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
HV6457 .W66 2009 Lynching and spectacle : HV6459 .A64 2007 Lynching photographs / HV6464 .D73 2003 At the hands of persons unknown : HV6477 .A38 2007 Race, space, and riots in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles / HV6477.A56 1968B Report. HV6477 .B87 Black violence : HV6477 .H5 1969B Pen and pencil sketches of the great riots

Includes bibliographical references (p. 305-329) and index.

An overview of race riots in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles -- The bloody riot of 1919 and its consequences -- The black uprising after King's assassination in 1968 -- The Harlem revolts of 1935 and 1943 -- The Harlem-Bedford Stuyvesant uprising of 1964 -- The Watts rebellion of 1965 : the beginning or the end? -- Riot redux : South Central, 1992 -- Explaining differences, predicting convergence?

"This study is the first attempt to compare six major race riots that occurred in the three largest American urban areas during the course of the twentieth century: in Chicago in 1919 and 1968; in New York in 1935/1943 and 1964; and in Los Angeles in 1965 and 1992. Race, Space, and Riots in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles weaves together detailed narratives of each riot, placing them in their changing historical contexts and showing how urban space, political regimes, and economic conditions - not simply an abstract "race conflict" - have structured the nature and extent of urban rebellions. Building on her previous comparative history of these three cities, Janet Abu-Lughod draws upon archival research, primary sources, case studies, and personal observations to reconstruct events - especially for the 1964 Harlem-Bedford Stuyvesant uprising and Chicago's 1968 riots where no documented studies are available. By focusing on the similarities and differences in each city, identifying the unique and persisting issues, and evaluating the ways political leaders, law enforcement, and the local political culture have either defused or exacerbated urban violence, this book points the way toward alleviating long-standing ethnic and racial tensions." "Race, Space, and Riots In Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles offers a deeper understanding of past - and future - urban race relations while emphasizing that until persistent racial and economic inequalities are meaningfully resolved, the tensions leading to racial violence will continue to exist in America's cities and betray our professed democratic values."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this interesting and provocative book, sociologist Abu-Lughod (emer., Northwestern) describes and analyzes the history and anatomy of six 20th-century "race riots" in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. Based on these comparative case studies, she argues that there is a clear connection between urban spatial arrangements--i.e. patterns of housing segregation--and racial relations. More generally, she contends, her historical analysis suggests that "race riots" have been most likely to occur under conditions of "extreme economic, political, and spatial processes of exclusion and marginalization of African Americans." She identifies four factors that directly affected the "frequency, duration, and degree of violence" in the six cases: the diversity, concentration, and relative size of the population defined as "black"; the history and behavior of the municipal authorities--government and police; the political influence of the black community; and the structure of the local economy. While there is little in the book that will surprise experts in the field, Abu-Lughod provides a detailed and compelling analysis of the grim consequences of racism in US society. Well written and accessible, this book is a "must buy" for all university libraries. Summing Up: Essential. All academic levels/libraries. N. B. Rosenthal emeritus, SUNY Old Westbury

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Janet L. Abu-Lughod is an American sociologist who specializes in social change and urbanization in the developing world. She was educated at the University of Chicago and the University of Massachusetts. She began her career as an urban planner and research consultant to organizations dealing with community development issues and housing problems. <p> As an academic, she taught at the University of Cairo and Smith College before moving to Northwestern University. She taught sociology at the New School for Social Research in New York, where she conducted research on urban problems. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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