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A season of youth : the American Revolution and the historical imagination / Michael Kammen.

By: Kammen, Michael G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: A Borzoi book.Publisher: New York : Knopf, 1978Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxi, 384 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0394496515; 9780394496511.Subject(s): United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Influence | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Art and the revolution | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Literature and the revolution | Amerikaanse Vrijheidsoorlog | Beeldvorming | États-Unis -- Histoire -- 1775-1783 (Révolution) -- Influence | États-Unis -- Histoire -- 1775-1783 (Révolution) -- Art et révolution | États-Unis -- Histoire -- 1775-1783 (Révolution) -- Littérature et révolution | Kunst | Unabhängigkeitsbewegung | USA | Amerikaanse Vrijheidsoorlog | Beeldvorming | Kunst | Unabhängigkeitsbewegung | USAAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Season of youth.DDC classification: 973.3 Other classification: 15.85 | NK 4900
Contents:
Revolution and tradition in American culture -- Revisions of the revolution in an un-revolutionary culture -- Revolutionary iconography in national tradition -- Reshaping the past to persuade the present -- A responsive revolution in historical romance -- The American revolution as national 'rite de passage' -- Imagination, tradition, and national character -- The Declaration of Independence in American political humor.
Summary: Publisher description: What has the American Revolution meant to Americans during the two centuries since it began? In this book Kammen once again dispels the mists of cultural misunderstanding and national self-deception as he reveals to us how this, the most central event in our past, has been seen by those in the mainstream of our culture as well as by dissenting social critics. The result is a fresh and unprecedented contribution to American historical writing and to American self-knowledge.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E209 .K35 1978 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100297266

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Revolution and tradition in American culture -- Revisions of the revolution in an un-revolutionary culture -- Revolutionary iconography in national tradition -- Reshaping the past to persuade the present -- A responsive revolution in historical romance -- The American revolution as national 'rite de passage' -- Imagination, tradition, and national character -- The Declaration of Independence in American political humor.

Publisher description: What has the American Revolution meant to Americans during the two centuries since it began? In this book Kammen once again dispels the mists of cultural misunderstanding and national self-deception as he reveals to us how this, the most central event in our past, has been seen by those in the mainstream of our culture as well as by dissenting social critics. The result is a fresh and unprecedented contribution to American historical writing and to American self-knowledge.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Gedaliah Kammen was born in Rochester, New York on October 25, 1936. He received a bachelor's degree in history from George Washington University and master's and doctoral degrees in history from Harvard University. He was a professor of American history and culture at Cornell University since 1965. He wrote numerous books including A Season of Youth, A Machine That Would Go of Itself, Mystic Chords of Memory: The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture, Visual Shock, and Digging Up the Dead: A History of Notable American Reburials. He received the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for history for People of Paradox: An Inquiry Concerning the Origins of American Civilization. He died on November 29, 2013 at the age of 77. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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