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The epistolary novel : representation of consciousness / Joe Bray.

By: Bray, Joe.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Routledge studies in eighteenth-century literature: 1.Publisher: London ; New York : Routledge, 2003Description: 153 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0415306108 (alk. paper); 9780415306102 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Epistolary fiction, English -- History and criticism | English fiction -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Consciousness in literatureDDC classification: 823/.509 Other classification: 18.05
Contents:
Introduction: consciousness, the novel and the letter -- Sex and politics: the epistolary novel before 1740 -- Reserve and memory: Richardson and the experiencing self -- Sentiment and sensibility: the late eighteenth-century letter -- From first to third: Austen and epistolary style -- Postscript: the case of Herzog.
Review: "The epistolary novel is a form which has been neglected in most accounts of the stylistic development of the novel. This book argues that the way that the eighteenth-century epistolary novel represented consciousness had a significant influence on the later novel." "The letters studied here reveal complex tensions within the divided minds of their writers. The close stylistic analysis presented in this study suggests that the epistolary novel can probe individual psychology in sophisticated depth." "Critics have drawn a distinction between the self at the time of writing and the self at the time at which events or emotions were experienced. This book demonstrates that the tensions within consciousness are the result of a continual interaction between the two selves of the letter-writer. It charts the oscillation between these two selves in the epistolary novels of, amongst others, Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Fanny Burney and Charlotte Smith. The final chapter analyses the subtle way in which Jane Austen represents the consciousness of her characters and argues that, like many later novelists, Austen is indebted to the psychological tension and inner conflict which are characteristic of the epistolary novel."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR858 .E65 B73 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001702323

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"The epistolary novel is a form which has been neglected in most accounts of the stylistic development of the novel. This book argues that the way that the eighteenth-century epistolary novel represented consciousness had a significant influence on the later novel." "The letters studied here reveal complex tensions within the divided minds of their writers. The close stylistic analysis presented in this study suggests that the epistolary novel can probe individual psychology in sophisticated depth." "Critics have drawn a distinction between the self at the time of writing and the self at the time at which events or emotions were experienced. This book demonstrates that the tensions within consciousness are the result of a continual interaction between the two selves of the letter-writer. It charts the oscillation between these two selves in the epistolary novels of, amongst others, Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Fanny Burney and Charlotte Smith. The final chapter analyses the subtle way in which Jane Austen represents the consciousness of her characters and argues that, like many later novelists, Austen is indebted to the psychological tension and inner conflict which are characteristic of the epistolary novel."--BOOK JACKET.

1. Introduction: consciousness, the novel and the letter -- 2. Sex and politics: the epistolary novel before 1740 -- 3. Reserve and memory: Richardson and the experiencing self -- 4. Sentiment and sensibility: the late eighteenth-century letter -- 5. From first to third: Austen and epistolary style -- 6. Postscript: the case of Herzog.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joe Bray lectures in Literary Stylistics at the University of Stirling, having previously held positions at the Universities of Strathclyde, Cambridge and Luton. He has published on Samuel Richardson and Jane Austen and is co-editor of Ma(r)king the Text: The Presentation of Meaning on the Literary Page (Ashgate, 2000).

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