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Inventing black women : African American women poets and self-representation, 1877-2000 / Ajuan Maria Mance.

By: Mance, Ajuan Maria.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 202 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781572334922 (hbk. : alk. paper); 1572334924 (hbk. : alk. paper); 9781572336513; 157233651X.Subject(s): American poetry -- African American authors -- History and criticism | Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African American women -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | African American women -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | American poetry -- Women authors -- History and criticism | African American women in literature | African Americans in literature | Race relations in literature | Gender identity in literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Inventing black women.; Online version:: Inventing black women.DDC classification: 811/.509896073 LOC classification: PS310.N4 | M36 2007
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Invisible bodies, invisible work: nineteenth-century American womanhood and the pastoral of the American homescape -- 1: Sole and earnest endeavor: African American women's poetry in the late nineteenth century -- 2: Black woman as object and symbol: African American women poets in the Harlem renaissance -- 3: Revolutionary dreams: African American women poets in the black arts movement -- 4: Locating the black female subject: late-twentieth-century African American women poets and the landscape of the body -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: From Book Jacket Insert: Inventing Black Women fills important gaps in our understanding of how African American women poets have resisted those conventional notions of gender and race that limit the visibility of Black female subjects. The first historical and thematic survey of African American women's poetry, this book examines the key developments that have shape the growing body of poems by and about Black women since the end of slavery and reconstruction, as it offers incisive readings of individual works by important poets such as Alice B Neal, Maggie Pogue Johnson, Alice Dunbar Nelson, Sonia Sanchez, Lucille Clifton, and Audre Lorde, as well as many others. Ajuan Maria Mance establishes that the history of African American women's poetry revolves around the struggle of the Black female poet against two marginalizing forces: the widespread association of womanhood with the figure of the middle-class, white female; and the similar association of Blackness with the figure of the African American male. In so doing, she looks closely at the major trends in Black women's poetry during each of four critical moments in African American literary history: the post-Reconstruction era from 1877 to 1910; the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s; the Black Arts Movement from 1965-1975; and the period from 1975-2000. Inventing Black Women will prove an invaluable resource for scholars and students of American literature, African American studies, and women's studies.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS310 .N4 M36 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001939396
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PS310.M4 J8 Metaphor and the poetry of Williams, Pound, and Stevens. PS310.M8 L4 Musical influence on American poetry. PS310.N4 M33 Dynamite voices / PS310 .N4 M36 2007 Inventing black women : PS310.N4 R4 Drumvoices : PS310 .N4 T48 2000 Extraordinary measures : PS310.R4 B3 1968 Religious thought in the greater American poets.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-194) and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Invisible bodies, invisible work: nineteenth-century American womanhood and the pastoral of the American homescape -- 1: Sole and earnest endeavor: African American women's poetry in the late nineteenth century -- 2: Black woman as object and symbol: African American women poets in the Harlem renaissance -- 3: Revolutionary dreams: African American women poets in the black arts movement -- 4: Locating the black female subject: late-twentieth-century African American women poets and the landscape of the body -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

From Book Jacket Insert: Inventing Black Women fills important gaps in our understanding of how African American women poets have resisted those conventional notions of gender and race that limit the visibility of Black female subjects. The first historical and thematic survey of African American women's poetry, this book examines the key developments that have shape the growing body of poems by and about Black women since the end of slavery and reconstruction, as it offers incisive readings of individual works by important poets such as Alice B Neal, Maggie Pogue Johnson, Alice Dunbar Nelson, Sonia Sanchez, Lucille Clifton, and Audre Lorde, as well as many others. Ajuan Maria Mance establishes that the history of African American women's poetry revolves around the struggle of the Black female poet against two marginalizing forces: the widespread association of womanhood with the figure of the middle-class, white female; and the similar association of Blackness with the figure of the African American male. In so doing, she looks closely at the major trends in Black women's poetry during each of four critical moments in African American literary history: the post-Reconstruction era from 1877 to 1910; the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s; the Black Arts Movement from 1965-1975; and the period from 1975-2000. Inventing Black Women will prove an invaluable resource for scholars and students of American literature, African American studies, and women's studies.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mance (Mills College) has crafted this gem of a book in a way that captures the voices of African American women from the post-Civil War period to the present. She includes poets, poems, and exegesis of poems from Reconstruction (1877-1910), the Harlem Renaissance (1920s), the Black Arts Movement (1960s), and the late 20th century, devoting a chapter to each. Mance deftly traces the evolution from invisibility--women writing in a gender-free voice or in the voice of the black, male persona--to unmistakable identity. Poems by Martha G. Withers, Lydia H. Sigourney, et al. speak in opposition to "true womanhood," an ideal propagated by white society; Gwendolyn Brooks, Betsy Erkkila, and others complement the black male poets and literati of the 1920s. Intrepid forays by Gwendolyn Bennett, Johari Amini, and the like lead the way to the genuine black, female voice now heard clearly in the poems of such brilliant and universal poets as Lucille Clifton and Nikki Giovanni. This is a much-needed contribution to American, African American, and gender studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates; faculty. L. L. Johnson Lewis and Clark College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ajuan Maria Mance is an associate professor of English at Mills College and the Robert and Ann Wert Professor of American Literature. Her articles and reviews have appeared in such publications as (Re)Covering the Black Female Body, The Journal of African American Studies, and Callaloo.

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