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Disunion! : the coming of the American Civil War, 1789-1859 / Elizabeth R. Varon.

By: Varon, Elizabeth R, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Littlefield history of the Civil War era: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008Description: xii, 455 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780807832325 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807832324 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807871591 (pbk.); 0807871591 (pbk.).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865 -- Sources | Sectionalism (United States) -- History | Sectionalism (United States) -- History -- Sources | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes | Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Antislavery movements -- United States -- History | Rhetoric -- Political aspects -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 973.7/11
Contents:
The language of terrifying prophecy : disunion debates in the early republic -- We claim our rights : the advent of abolitionism -- Ruinous tendencies : the anti-abolition backlash -- The idea will become familiar : disunion in the era of mass party politics -- Oh for a man who is a man : debating slavery's expansion -- That is revolution! : the crisis of 1850 -- Beneath the iron heel : fugitive slaves and bleeding Kansas -- To consummate its boldest designs : the slave power confronts the republicans -- War to the knife : images of the coming fight -- Epilogue: The Rubicon is passed : the war and beyond.
Summary: Varon blends political history with intellectual and cultural history to examine the ongoing debates over disunion that long preceded the secession crisis. She focuses not only on politicians but also on a wide range of reformers, editors, writers, and commentators.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E302.1 .V37 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001939990

"A Caravan book"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 401-429) and index.

The language of terrifying prophecy : disunion debates in the early republic -- We claim our rights : the advent of abolitionism -- Ruinous tendencies : the anti-abolition backlash -- The idea will become familiar : disunion in the era of mass party politics -- Oh for a man who is a man : debating slavery's expansion -- That is revolution! : the crisis of 1850 -- Beneath the iron heel : fugitive slaves and bleeding Kansas -- To consummate its boldest designs : the slave power confronts the republicans -- War to the knife : images of the coming fight -- Epilogue: The Rubicon is passed : the war and beyond.

Varon blends political history with intellectual and cultural history to examine the ongoing debates over disunion that long preceded the secession crisis. She focuses not only on politicians but also on a wide range of reformers, editors, writers, and commentators.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this inaugural volume of a projected 16 in the publisher's "Littlefield History of the Civil War Era" series, Varon (Temple Univ.) revisits and revises the tortured terrain of slavery and union from the early republic to the aftermath of John Brown's Raid. By depicting disunion as a rhetoric of prophecy, threat, accusation, process, and program that allowed politicians and partisans to depict themselves as defenders and their opponents as disruptors of the "American experiment," Varon compellingly shows how slavery "encompassed" the debate over the meaning of liberty, the Constitution, and future of the US. Her argument provides a useful bridge in the historiography between those who believe secession and civil war were inevitable, and those who believe that contingency hijacked an erstwhile-united population and drove one element in it toward secession. Although white and black Americans professed a devotion to the Union as a transcendent idea, white Americans proved unable to agree on the place of slavery in the actual Union as its status was continuously debated in the welter of political and moral events of the antebellum era. This is highly readable political, social, and intellectual history at its best. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. E. R. Crowther Adams State College

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