Normal view MARC view ISBD view

General Lee's army : from victory to collapse / Joseph T. Glatthaar.

By: Glatthaar, Joseph T, 1956-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Free Press, 2008Edition: 1st Free Press hardcover ed.Description: xv, 600 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, plans ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780684827872; 0684827875.Subject(s): Confederate States of America. Army of Northern Virginia | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Virginia -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870 -- Military leadership | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Regimental histories | Soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- Attitudes | Soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- Psychology | Soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: General Lee's army.DDC classification: 973.7/42
Contents:
Comedy of errors, tragedy of triumph -- Secession and mobilizing for war -- The Volunteers of '61 -- Why they enlisted -- Becoming soldiers -- "To slaughter one another like brutes" -- "A great canvass city" -- Keeping the army together -- Clashes within the high command -- Playing troops like fireflies -- Lee in command -- The battle for Richmond: the Seven Days' campaign -- Taking war to the enemy -- A failure of discipline -- Lee's officer corps and army culture -- The soldiers of '62 -- Supplying the army -- Camp and recreation -- Religion and morality -- Chancellorsville -- Arms and ammunition -- The failure at Gettysburg -- Home front -- Blacks and the army -- Combat -- Lee and the high command -- Preparing for the spring campaign of 1864 -- The overland campaign -- The trenches -- Medical care -- Manpower -- Desertion -- The grind of war -- Spiral of defeat -- The final days -- The sample.
Summary: General Robert E. Lee's army was a surprise to almost everyone: With daring early victories and an invasion into the North, they nearly managed to convince the North to give up the fight. Astonishingly, after 150 years of scholarship, there are still some major surprises about the Army of Northern Virginia. Historian Joseph T. Glatthaar draws on sources assembled over two decades--from letters and diaries, to official war records, to a new, definitive database of statistics--to rewrite the history of the Civil War's most important army and, indeed, of the war itself. The history of Lee's army is a powerful lens on the entire war. The fate of Lee's army explains why the South almost won--and why it lost. The story of his men--their reasons for fighting, their cohesion, mounting casualties, diseases, supply problems, and discipline problems--tells it all.--From publisher description.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E470.2 .G58 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001940170

Includes bibliographical references (p. 543-581) and index.

Comedy of errors, tragedy of triumph -- Secession and mobilizing for war -- The Volunteers of '61 -- Why they enlisted -- Becoming soldiers -- "To slaughter one another like brutes" -- "A great canvass city" -- Keeping the army together -- Clashes within the high command -- Playing troops like fireflies -- Lee in command -- The battle for Richmond: the Seven Days' campaign -- Taking war to the enemy -- A failure of discipline -- Lee's officer corps and army culture -- The soldiers of '62 -- Supplying the army -- Camp and recreation -- Religion and morality -- Chancellorsville -- Arms and ammunition -- The failure at Gettysburg -- Home front -- Blacks and the army -- Combat -- Lee and the high command -- Preparing for the spring campaign of 1864 -- The overland campaign -- The trenches -- Medical care -- Manpower -- Desertion -- The grind of war -- Spiral of defeat -- The final days -- The sample.

General Robert E. Lee's army was a surprise to almost everyone: With daring early victories and an invasion into the North, they nearly managed to convince the North to give up the fight. Astonishingly, after 150 years of scholarship, there are still some major surprises about the Army of Northern Virginia. Historian Joseph T. Glatthaar draws on sources assembled over two decades--from letters and diaries, to official war records, to a new, definitive database of statistics--to rewrite the history of the Civil War's most important army and, indeed, of the war itself. The history of Lee's army is a powerful lens on the entire war. The fate of Lee's army explains why the South almost won--and why it lost. The story of his men--their reasons for fighting, their cohesion, mounting casualties, diseases, supply problems, and discipline problems--tells it all.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Glatthaar (North Carolina) offers an interesting combination of analytical overviews and syntheses punctuated with supporting quotes and detailed analysis. This detail and understanding should be expected because the book is the result of a lifetime's research. At the same time, there are vignettes that add color and hard data to this chronologically organized work. Within the easily read, flowing text, there are chapters that go into more detail about supplying the army with food and basic equipment, the sources of men in 1861 as opposed to 1863, casualties, and the psychology/morale of those in the ranks. As an example, the book's account of the armament supply situation for the Army of Northern Virginia includes a discussion of bullet production and the issuance of undersized balls to alleviate fouling and speed up firing rates. The author offers numerous insights on the political nature of army command and Southern society's impact on the army. The source material is fairly well referenced for such a broad, sweeping account. The index is helpful, but it is necessary to read closely because the minutiae are often not included. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. L. E. Babits East Carolina University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.