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Lynching to belong : claiming Whiteness through racial violence / Cynthia Skove Nevels.

By: Nevels, Cynthia Skove, 1955-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Centennial series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University: no. 106.Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: xi, 189 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781585445899 (cloth : alk. paper); 1585445894 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Brazos County (Tex.) -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Brazos County (Tex.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Whites -- Race identity -- Texas -- Brazos County -- History | European Americans -- Race identity -- Texas -- Brazos County -- History | Immigrants -- Texas -- Brazos County -- Social conditions | Immigrants -- Texas -- Brazos County -- Attitudes -- History | Racism -- Texas -- Brazos County -- History | African Americans -- Crimes against -- Texas -- Brazos County -- History | Lynching -- Texas -- Brazos County -- History | Violence -- Texas -- Brazos County -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Lynching to belong.; Online version:: Lynching to belong.DDC classification: 305.8009764/242
Contents:
The banner county -- A White man's town -- The Italians -- The Irish -- The Bohemians and the Jews.
Summary: Nevels argues that five racially motivated murders of black men in Brazos County, Texas, point to an emerging social phenomenon of the time: the desire of newly arrived European immigrants to assert their place in society and the use of racial violence to achieve that end.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F392 .B84 N485 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001941814

Includes bibliographical references (p. [175]-181) and index.

The banner county -- A White man's town -- The Italians -- The Irish -- The Bohemians and the Jews.

Nevels argues that five racially motivated murders of black men in Brazos County, Texas, point to an emerging social phenomenon of the time: the desire of newly arrived European immigrants to assert their place in society and the use of racial violence to achieve that end.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The last several years have witnessed an upsurge in the study of racial violence, especially lynching. In Texas history alone, two major works have appeared since 2004: Patricia Bernstein's study of the infamous Waco lynching of 1915 (The First Waco Horror, CH, Mar'06, 43-4216) and William Carrigan's more theoretical study, The Making of a Lynching Culture (CH, Sep'05, 43-0513). This new work takes a somewhat different approach to this dark aspect of the recent US past. Nevels (Blinn College) focuses on Brazos County in Texas and the demographic and political changes it experienced during the late 19th and very early 20th centuries. In 1890, African Americans became a majority of the county's population; at the same time, the county experienced an influx of European immigrants. Nevels compellingly argues that the emerging black majority led to efforts to suppress black political power, and the new European minorities used racism and their participation in racial violence as a means to establish their "whiteness." Her excellent, detailed study of the region's ethnic and racial composition clearly establishes the complex diversity of Brazos County's population, and by implication, other areas of the South, and should contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the history of these communities. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. C. D. Wintz Texas Southern University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

CYNTHIA SKOVE NEVELS is a history instructor at Blinn College in Bryan, Texas. She is a member of the Texas State Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians. This is her first book.

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