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To see ourselves as others see us : how publics abroad view the United States after 9/11 / Ole R. Holsti.

By: Holsti, Ole R.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2008Description: xiv, 234 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780472070367 (cloth : alk. paper); 0472070363 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780472050369 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0472050362 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Foreign public opinion | United States -- Foreign relations -- 2001-2009 -- Public opinion | United States -- Social conditions -- 21st century -- Public opinion | United States -- Foreign public opinion -- Case studies | Anti-Americanism | United States -- RelationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: To see ourselves as others see us.DDC classification: 303.48/27300905
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. How publics abroad view the United States and its foreign policies -- How the United States is viewed abroad -- America's international role -- Sensitivity to the interests of others -- The uses of force -- The war on terrorism -- Iraq -- Conclusion -- 3. How publics abroad view Americans and American society -- The American people and society -- American institutions and values -- Conclusion -- 4. The impact of "how they see us" : seven mini-case studies -- Turkey -- Indonesia -- Mexico -- Canada -- Australia -- Morocco -- South Korea -- 5. Explanations for anti-American opinions -- The end of the Cold War -- Globalization -- America's virtues and values -- Irrationality -- Strategic scapegoating -- Ignorance -- U.S. policies -- 6. The impact of American policies -- September 11 and the invasion of Afghanistan -- The Iraq War -- American rhetoric -- Sensitivity to domestic interests -- Deep partisan cleavages -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E895 .H65 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001941715

Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-227) and index.

1. Introduction -- 2. How publics abroad view the United States and its foreign policies -- How the United States is viewed abroad -- America's international role -- Sensitivity to the interests of others -- The uses of force -- The war on terrorism -- Iraq -- Conclusion -- 3. How publics abroad view Americans and American society -- The American people and society -- American institutions and values -- Conclusion -- 4. The impact of "how they see us" : seven mini-case studies -- Turkey -- Indonesia -- Mexico -- Canada -- Australia -- Morocco -- South Korea -- 5. Explanations for anti-American opinions -- The end of the Cold War -- Globalization -- America's virtues and values -- Irrationality -- Strategic scapegoating -- Ignorance -- U.S. policies -- 6. The impact of American policies -- September 11 and the invasion of Afghanistan -- The Iraq War -- American rhetoric -- Sensitivity to domestic interests -- Deep partisan cleavages -- Conclusion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

After initial sympathy for the US following the September 11, 2001, attacks, world public opinion turned against US foreign policy and society. Holsti (emer., political science, Duke) attempts to explain this fact based on global statistical surveys, polling, and case studies. He identifies seven reasons for the loss of support: the invasion of Iraq and unilateral foreign policy; criticism of egotistical US social values; irrational hatred and envy; the scapegoating of the US for others' failure to take more responsibility; the use of propaganda and ignorance of the US; the end of the Cold War; and the impact of globalization. Holsti believes that President Bush's rhetoric and demeanor turned off many allies, NATO, and the OAS. Given the speed of modern communications, perspectives rapidly changed at the expense of the US. This work compares favorably to Hating America by Barry Rubin and Judith Rubin (CH, Jul'05, 42-6707). Summing Up: Recommended. Faculty, graduate students, and professionals. S. Prisco III Stevens Institute of Technology

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Ole R. Holsti is George V. Allen Professor Emeritus of International Affairs in the Department of Political Science at Duke University and author of Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy . Visit Ole Holsti's website .</p>

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