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U.S. presidents and Latin American interventions : pursuing regime change in the Cold War / Michael Grow.

By: Grow, Michael.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2008Description: xiv, 266 p. : map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780700615865 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700615865 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700618880; 0700618880.Other title: US presidents and Latin American interventions.Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- Latin America | Latin America -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 -- Case studies | Presidents -- United States -- Decision making -- Case studies | Intervention (International law) -- History -- 20th century -- Case studies | Regime change -- Latin America -- History -- 20th century -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: U.S. presidents and Latin American interventions.DDC classification: 327.73080090/45 Other classification: ML 5800
Contents:
Guatemala, 1954 -- Cuba, 1961 -- British Guiana, 1963 -- Dominican Republic, 1965 -- Chile, 1970 -- Nicaragua, 1981 -- Grenada, 1983 -- Panama, 1989.
Review: "From Eisenhower's toppling of Arbenz in Guatemala in 1954 to Bush's overthrow of Noriega in Panama in 1989, Grow casts a close eye on eight major cases of U.S. intervention in the Western Hemisphere, offering fresh interpretations of why they occurred and what they signified." "Grow argues that it was not threats to U.S. national security or endangered economic interests that were decisive in prompting presidents to launch these interventions. Rather, each intervention was part of a symbolic geopolitical chess match in which the White House sought to project an image of overpowering strength to audiences at home and abroad in order to preserve both national and presidential credibility."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1418 .G83 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001941673

Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-259) and index.

Guatemala, 1954 -- Cuba, 1961 -- British Guiana, 1963 -- Dominican Republic, 1965 -- Chile, 1970 -- Nicaragua, 1981 -- Grenada, 1983 -- Panama, 1989.

"From Eisenhower's toppling of Arbenz in Guatemala in 1954 to Bush's overthrow of Noriega in Panama in 1989, Grow casts a close eye on eight major cases of U.S. intervention in the Western Hemisphere, offering fresh interpretations of why they occurred and what they signified." "Grow argues that it was not threats to U.S. national security or endangered economic interests that were decisive in prompting presidents to launch these interventions. Rather, each intervention was part of a symbolic geopolitical chess match in which the White House sought to project an image of overpowering strength to audiences at home and abroad in order to preserve both national and presidential credibility."--BOOK JACKET.

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CHOICE Review

Grow (emer., Ohio Univ.) reviews US interventions in Latin America during the Cold War to argue these actions were not caused by economic or national security concerns, but by the US resolve to preserve its international credibility, the pressure of domestic politics, and the demands of Latin American elites. The US could not appear weak to its global communist adversaries, and each president needed the domestic advantages that a strong foreign policy bought. Grow analyzes eight interventions, from Guatemala in 1954, which sets the pattern for his analysis, to Cuba, which symbolizes the fate that the rest of Latin America must avoid, to later actions in Chile, Nicaragua, Grenada, and Panama. These last chapters are particularly well done. Grow proves that the imperatives he outlines played a role in the US approach to the region, but the overall effect is to make Latin America just another Cold War battleground, and to leave readers asking how preserving US credibility there differed from doing the same in Berlin, China, or Vietnam. Nevertheless, Grow's review of the literature on US-Latin American relations and his perspective on that relationship is a useful addition to the field. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. L. M. Lees Old Dominion University

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