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Medicine bags and dog tags : American Indian veterans from colonial times to the second Iraq War / Al Carroll.

By: Carroll, Al.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008Description: 287 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780803210851 (cloth : alk. paper); 080321085X (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States. -- Armed Forces -- Indian troops -- History | Indian veterans | Indians of North America -- Government relations | Indians of North America -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Medicine bags and dog tags.DDC classification: 323.1197
Contents:
"Let's see some of that Apache know-how" : depictions of Native veterans in fiction -- "They kill Indians mostly, don't they?" : Rogers' Rangers and the adoption of Indian tactics -- Before a Native veteran tradition can begin : the case of Mexico -- Thunderbird warriors, injuneers, and the USNs Red Cloud : Native and pseudo-Indian images and names in the military -- The super scout image : using a stereotype to help Native traditions revive -- "Savages again" : World War II -- The half-hidden spirit guide totemic mark : Korea -- An American ka in Indian country : Vietnam -- Bringing the war home : the American Indian movement, Wounded Knee II, counterinsurgency, and a new direction for warrior societies -- "Fighting terrorism since 1492" : the Gulf War, the war in Afghanistan, and the second Iraq War -- "A woman warrior, just like Lozen" : the meaning of the life of Lori Piestewa to Natives and non-natives.
Review: "As far back as colonial times, Native individuals and communities have fought alongside European and American soldiers against common enemies. Medicine Bags and Dog Tags is the story of these Native men and women whose military service has defended ancient homelands, perpetuated longstanding warrior traditions, and promoted tribal survival and sovereignty.".Summary: "Drawing on a rich array of archival records and oral traditions, AI Carroll offers the most complete account of Native veterans to date and is the first to take an international approach, drawing comparisons with Native veteran traditions in Canada and Mexico. He debunks the "natural warrior" stereotype as well as the popular assumption that Natives join the military as a refuge against extreme poverty and as a form of assimilation. The reasons for enlistment, he argues, though varied and complex, are invariably connected to the relative strengths of tribal warrior traditions within communities.Summary: Carroll provides a fascinating look at how the culture and training of the American military influenced the makeup and tactics of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s and 1970s and how, in turn, Natives have influenced U.S. military tactics, symbolism, and basic training."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E98 .M5 C37 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001943729

Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-274) and index.

"Let's see some of that Apache know-how" : depictions of Native veterans in fiction -- "They kill Indians mostly, don't they?" : Rogers' Rangers and the adoption of Indian tactics -- Before a Native veteran tradition can begin : the case of Mexico -- Thunderbird warriors, injuneers, and the USNs Red Cloud : Native and pseudo-Indian images and names in the military -- The super scout image : using a stereotype to help Native traditions revive -- "Savages again" : World War II -- The half-hidden spirit guide totemic mark : Korea -- An American ka in Indian country : Vietnam -- Bringing the war home : the American Indian movement, Wounded Knee II, counterinsurgency, and a new direction for warrior societies -- "Fighting terrorism since 1492" : the Gulf War, the war in Afghanistan, and the second Iraq War -- "A woman warrior, just like Lozen" : the meaning of the life of Lori Piestewa to Natives and non-natives.

"As far back as colonial times, Native individuals and communities have fought alongside European and American soldiers against common enemies. Medicine Bags and Dog Tags is the story of these Native men and women whose military service has defended ancient homelands, perpetuated longstanding warrior traditions, and promoted tribal survival and sovereignty.".

"Drawing on a rich array of archival records and oral traditions, AI Carroll offers the most complete account of Native veterans to date and is the first to take an international approach, drawing comparisons with Native veteran traditions in Canada and Mexico. He debunks the "natural warrior" stereotype as well as the popular assumption that Natives join the military as a refuge against extreme poverty and as a form of assimilation. The reasons for enlistment, he argues, though varied and complex, are invariably connected to the relative strengths of tribal warrior traditions within communities.

Carroll provides a fascinating look at how the culture and training of the American military influenced the makeup and tactics of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s and 1970s and how, in turn, Natives have influenced U.S. military tactics, symbolism, and basic training."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Carroll (St. Phillips College) has written a highly informative but uneven account. Of Apache descent, he draws on his own military service, fieldwork, and much too limited archival research. He insists that Indian participation in the US military should not be seen as assimilation. Besides risking their lives and contributing to overall military life, Carroll asserts that Indians actually used their service to defend, preserve, protect, and revive their own cultural practices. Fascinatingly, he describes how Indians viewed the US flag, wrote and sang songs of their war experiences, empathized with their enemies, and identified with other indigenous peoples, such as the Hmong in the Vietnam War. Carroll's chapter on his friend Lori Piestawa, a Hopi killed in Iraq in 2003, adds to the book's value; however, the author tries to cover too much ground and goes off on tangents. Minor errors include referring to Jake Thompson as Jim Thompson (p.153); identifying Chief, Faithkeeper, and noted artist Oren Lyons as a historian (p.185); and misspelling Powhatan (p.180). His assertion that Indians in Canada were treated better than those in the US shows a lack of knowledge about Canadian/First Nations relations. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers/public libraries. L. M. Hauptman State University of New York at New Paltz

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Al Carroll is Mescalero Apache (unenrolled), Mexican, and Irish. He is an adjunct professor of history at St. Phillip's College in San Antonio, Texas, and his articles have appeared in several contributed volumes.

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