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Leadership ethics : an introduction / Terry L. Price.

By: Price, Terry L, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008Description: xi, 252 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780521875837 (hardback); 0521875838 (hardback); 9780521699112 (pbk.); 0521699118 (pbk.).Subject(s): Leadership -- Moral and ethical aspectsDDC classification: 174 LOC classification: HM1261 | .P75 2008Other classification: 85.08 | 89.54 | CC 7200 | CC 7262 | MD 7400
Contents:
Part I: Leader-centric approaches -- Relativism and exceptionalism -- Reason and amoralism -- Power and self-interest -- Traits and virtues -- Part II: Group-centric approaches -- Permission and consent -- Situations and circumstances -- Membership and moral particularity -- The greater good -- Everyday leadership ethics.
Review: "Are leaders morally special? Is there something ethically distinctive about the relationship between leaders and followers? Should leaders do whatever it takes to achieve group goals?" "Leadership Ethics draws on both moral theory and empirical research in psychology to evaluate the reasons everyday leaders give to justify breaking the rules. Written for people without a background in philosophy, it introduces readers to the moral theories that are relevant to leadership ethics: relativism, amoralism, egoism, virtue ethics, social contract theory, situation ethics, communitarianism, and cosmopolitan theories such as utilitarianism and transformational leadership." "Unlike many introductory texts, Leadership Ethics does more than simply acquaint readers with different approaches to leadership ethics. It defends the Kantian view that everyday leaders are not justified in breaking the moral rules."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM1261 .P75 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001946763

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-242) and index.

Part I: Leader-centric approaches -- Relativism and exceptionalism -- Reason and amoralism -- Power and self-interest -- Traits and virtues -- Part II: Group-centric approaches -- Permission and consent -- Situations and circumstances -- Membership and moral particularity -- The greater good -- Everyday leadership ethics.

"Are leaders morally special? Is there something ethically distinctive about the relationship between leaders and followers? Should leaders do whatever it takes to achieve group goals?" "Leadership Ethics draws on both moral theory and empirical research in psychology to evaluate the reasons everyday leaders give to justify breaking the rules. Written for people without a background in philosophy, it introduces readers to the moral theories that are relevant to leadership ethics: relativism, amoralism, egoism, virtue ethics, social contract theory, situation ethics, communitarianism, and cosmopolitan theories such as utilitarianism and transformational leadership." "Unlike many introductory texts, Leadership Ethics does more than simply acquaint readers with different approaches to leadership ethics. It defends the Kantian view that everyday leaders are not justified in breaking the moral rules."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The challenge in a leadership and ethics text is to cogently outline leadership theories and weigh the modern manifestations of said leadership against the timeless backdrop of moral philosophy. Price (Univ. of Richmond) chooses to explicate ethical principles by grouping the frameworks into leader-centric and group-centric approaches. Asking throughout whether rule breaking is justified in everyday leadership, the author answers in the form of a narrative that underscores the tension between relieving the "normal" human psyche and achieving the best moral analysis. Price tightly weaves threads from empirical psychology, leadership theory, and moral philosophy to provide a clear case for being duty bound to embrace the Kantian viewpoint. To not do so would be to prevent leadership ethics scholars from exercising their rational agency. A select bibliography offers neophytes leadership texts and ethical treatises in the form of a "greatest hits" list from each discipline. This work is especially valuable for undergraduate students and for professionals who have tried to slog through philosophers' original source materials without an able tour guide like Price. Extensive chapter notes. Summing Up: Highly recommended All levels of students, faculty, and professionals. G. E. Leaf Washington State University

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