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On empire : America, war, and global supremacy / Eric Hobsbawm.

By: Hobsbawm, E. J. (Eric J.), 1917-2012.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: xx, 97 p. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780375425370; 0375425373.Subject(s): Hegemony -- United States | World politics -- 21st century | Imperialism | War on Terrorism, 2001-2009DDC classification: 327.73
Contents:
On the end of empires -- War and peace in the twentieth century -- War, peace, and hegemony at the beginning of the twenty-first century -- Why America's hegemony differs from Britain's empire.
Summary: Assesses increasing world disorder in light of the inequities caused by free-market globalization, America's use of the terrorist threat as an excuse for unilateral deployment, and American hegemony in comparison to the British Empire.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JZ1312 .H63 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001950575

Includes bibliographical references (p. 93-97).

On the end of empires -- War and peace in the twentieth century -- War, peace, and hegemony at the beginning of the twenty-first century -- Why America's hegemony differs from Britain's empire.

Assesses increasing world disorder in light of the inequities caused by free-market globalization, America's use of the terrorist threat as an excuse for unilateral deployment, and American hegemony in comparison to the British Empire.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm extends his well-known analysis of the short 20th century (Age of Extremes, CH, Jun'95, 32-5790) into the 21st century in four revised lectures delivered between 2001 and 2005. The problem posed by decolonization a half century ago, namely, how to secure some semblance of world order among the expanding number of independent territorial states, was put off but not effectively resolved by the Cold War. One proof is the unprecedented rise of endemic violent conflict--civil war and population transfer--within (as opposed to across) state borders, including within parts of the former Soviet empire. Globalization only reinforces the obstacles before the US, whether it continues its impossible quest to rule the world on its own or seeks a restoration of the kind of liberal hegemony exercised in the decades before November 9, 1989 (the fall of the Berlin Wall) and September 11, 2001. The book ought to be read, taught, and wrestled with. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, graduate students, and research faculty. R. Vitalis University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eric Hobsbawm is a neo-Marxist historian of the Industrial Revolution who pays particular attention to the inequities toward the lower classes, especially in law and politics. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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