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Résistance : a woman's journal of struggle and defiance in occupied France / Agnès Humbert ; translated from the French and with notes by Barbara Mellor ; afterword by Julien Blanc.

By: Humbert, Agnès.
Contributor(s): Mellor, Barbara.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Bloomsbury, 2008Edition: 1st U.S. ed.Description: x, 370 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 1596915595 (hbk.); 9781596915596 (hbk.).Uniform titles: Notre guerre. English Subject(s): Humbert, Agnès -- Diaries | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, German | World War, 1939-1945 -- Underground movements -- France | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, French | Prisoners of war -- France -- Diaries | Prisoners of war -- Germany -- Diaries | France -- History -- German occupation, 1940-1945DDC classification: 940.53/44092 | B
Contents:
The fall of the Third Republic -- Paris under the Swastika -- In the prison du Cherche-Midi -- In the prison de la Sante -- In the prison de Fresnes -- In the communal cell -- Forced labour -- At the Phrix Rayon Factory -- The fall of the Third Reich -- Hunting the Nazis.
Summary: A real-life Suite Française, this riveting diary by a key female member of the French Resistance in WWII is translated into English for the first time. Agnès Humbert was an art historian in Paris during the German occupation in 1940. Though she might well have weathered the oppressive regime, Humbert was stirred to action by the atrocities she witnessed. In an act of astonishing bravery, she joined forces with several colleagues to form an organized resistance--very likely the first such group to fight back against the occupation. (In fact, their newsletter, Résistance, gave the French Resistance its name.) In the throes of their struggle for freedom, the members of Humbert's group were betrayed to the Gestapo; Humbert herself was imprisoned. In immediate, electrifying detail, Humbert describes her time in prison, her deportation to Germany, where for more than two years she endured a string of brutal labor camps, and the horror of discovering that seven of her friends were executed by a firing squad. But through the direst of conditions, and ill health in the labor camps, Humbert retains hope for herself, for her friends, and for humanity. Originally published in France in 1946, the book was soon forgotten and is now translated into English for the first time.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D805 .G3 H7713 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001950096
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D805.G3 F65 1984 For you the war is over : D805.G3 H553 1959 Commandant of Auschwitz; D805.G3 H558 1962 El comandante de Auschwitz : D805 .G3 H7713 2008 Résistance : D805.G3 S596 The harrowing of hell: Dachau D805.J3 F27 Bataan: D805.P6 A433 2000 All this hell :

Includes bibliographical references (p. [358]-359) and index.

The fall of the Third Republic -- Paris under the Swastika -- In the prison du Cherche-Midi -- In the prison de la Sante -- In the prison de Fresnes -- In the communal cell -- Forced labour -- At the Phrix Rayon Factory -- The fall of the Third Reich -- Hunting the Nazis.

A real-life Suite Française, this riveting diary by a key female member of the French Resistance in WWII is translated into English for the first time. Agnès Humbert was an art historian in Paris during the German occupation in 1940. Though she might well have weathered the oppressive regime, Humbert was stirred to action by the atrocities she witnessed. In an act of astonishing bravery, she joined forces with several colleagues to form an organized resistance--very likely the first such group to fight back against the occupation. (In fact, their newsletter, Résistance, gave the French Resistance its name.) In the throes of their struggle for freedom, the members of Humbert's group were betrayed to the Gestapo; Humbert herself was imprisoned. In immediate, electrifying detail, Humbert describes her time in prison, her deportation to Germany, where for more than two years she endured a string of brutal labor camps, and the horror of discovering that seven of her friends were executed by a firing squad. But through the direst of conditions, and ill health in the labor camps, Humbert retains hope for herself, for her friends, and for humanity. Originally published in France in 1946, the book was soon forgotten and is now translated into English for the first time.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This incredibly important publication will be welcomed by scholars and informed lay readers alike. Long out of print in the original French and never before available in English translation, this combination diary/memoir provides an engrossing account of the activities of the French Resistance by an early participant. Humbert, an art historian, was a member of one of the earliest (if not the earliest) resistance groups to be formed. Her diary account, begun in June 1940, recounts in riveting detail the atmosphere of panic and "scenes of savagery" that accompanied the fall of Paris and collapse of the Third Republic. Betrayed to the Gestapo, imprisoned both in France and in Germany, and deported to a slave labor camp, Humbert nonetheless survived the war and went on to write this personal and deeply moving memoir of her reflections upon these various experiences. Originally published in 1946, the French edition has long been an important resource for scholars. Translator Mellor, herself an expert in French culture, has included valuable complements to the original manuscript, providing readers with selected primary documents on the Resistance, biographical information on Humbert, and annotations to the text. Highly recommended.--Marie Marmo Mullaney, Caldwell Coll., N.J. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-From the very first word of this spellbinding diary, readers are transported to Paris, June 1940, with a bright and articulate founder of the Resistance movement. An art historian, Humbert joined forces with her colleagues, creating and bravely distributing an underground newspaper they named Resistance. Through her detailed and intimate diary entries, the author gives a mesmerizing, day-to-day picture of the movement. After being betrayed to the Germans, she was put in a stark, cold cell in a French prison, where she was interrogated; she never betrayed her colleagues, several of whom, she learned, were executed. After many months, she was taken to a labor camp and forced to work for years in horrific conditions on starvation rations, with increasingly poor health. Humbert exhibited spirit, courage, and determination to resist the Germans, sabotaging whatever she was forced to make in the factories they turned into labor camps, never losing sight of her fellow prisoners' needs as she struggled to keep up hope and survive. After being liberated by the Americans, she put herself in charge of her former captors and helped the Americans deal with the initial horrors left by the Germans. The book includes a detailed appendix of documents on the Resistance and 32 pages of translator's notes that put the author's comments in historical context. Humbert's wit and bravery, her charisma, will draw teens into this remarkable account.-Ellen Bell, Amador Valley High School, Pleasanton, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Agn #65533;s Humbert was a distinguished art historian and a member of the Muse#65533; de l'Homme group in the French Resistance. She survived the war and died in Valmondois, France, in 1963.</p> <p> Barbara Mellor is a translator specializing in the fine and decorative arts, art history, architectural history, fashion, design, and all things French. During her researches into a Resistance ambush of a German armored column in Aveyron, she stumbled across the 1946 edition of R#65533;sistance .</p>

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