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"Swing the sickle for the harvest is ripe" : gender and slavery in antebellum Georgia / Daina Ramey Berry.

By: Berry, Daina Ramey.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women in American history: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2007Description: xvi, 224 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780252031465 (cloth : alk. paper); 0252031466 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Women slaves -- Georgia -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Slaves -- Georgia -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Sex role -- Georgia -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Georgia -- Wilkes County -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Georgia -- Glynn County -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Economic aspects -- Georgia -- History -- 19th century | Community life -- Georgia -- Wilkes County -- History -- 19th century | Community life -- Georgia -- Glynn County -- History -- 19th century | Wilkes County (Ga.) -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Glynn County (Ga.) -- Race relations -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 307.72086/2509758172 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
"I had to work hard, plow, and go and split wood jus' like a man" : skill, gender, and productivity in agricultural settings -- "Dey s'lected me out to be a housegirl" : the privileges and pain of nonagricultural labor -- "There sho' was a sight of us" : enslaved family and community rituals -- "O, I never has forgot dat last dinner wit my folks" : enslaved family and community realities -- "For the current year" : the informal economy and slave hiring.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E445 .G3 B47 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001950328

Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-217) and index.

"I had to work hard, plow, and go and split wood jus' like a man" : skill, gender, and productivity in agricultural settings -- "Dey s'lected me out to be a housegirl" : the privileges and pain of nonagricultural labor -- "There sho' was a sight of us" : enslaved family and community rituals -- "O, I never has forgot dat last dinner wit my folks" : enslaved family and community realities -- "For the current year" : the informal economy and slave hiring.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A study of enslaved persons in Wilkes and Glynn counties in Georgia, this monograph examines the ways in which gender, age, geographic location, and the concept of skilled labor impacted how people experienced slavery. But as chapter 4 makes painfully clear, physical and sexual exploitation and the threat of sale made the lives of enslaved persons even more vulnerable than those of other working classes during the antebellum period. Especially valuable is Berry's analysis of how planters designated particular workers as skilled. Female agricultural workers with dexterous hands were sometimes considered to be as valuable as masons and woodworkers--traditionally male-dominated tasks of enslaved persons. Reconstructing the practices of slavery from plantation records, memoirs, and newspapers and the encounter with those practices through folk songs and ex-slave testimonies, Berry (Michigan State Univ.) succeeds in capturing commonalities and differences in slavery in white-majority communities (Wilkes County) and African American-majority communities (Glynn County). Although she suggests that her micro findings "have implications" for understanding slavery elsewhere, these are not developed, and only those who read antebellum community studies will readily appreciate this study's important contribution to historiography. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. E. R. Crowther Adams State College

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