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Because of race : how Americans debate harm and opportunity in our schools / Mica Pollock.

By: Pollock, Mica, 1971-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2008Description: xviii, 277 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780691125350 (cloth : alk. paper); 069112535X (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Discrimination in education -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 371.82900973 Other classification: 5,3 | DU 6002
Contents:
Introduction -- Rebuttal 1: harms to children of color cannot be proved -- Rebuttal 2: harms to children of color should not be discussed -- Rebuttal 3: harms to children of color cannot be remedied -- Rebuttal 4: harms to children of color are too "small" to fix -- Conclusion: arguing toward everyday justice in the new civil rights era.
Summary: In because of Race, Mica Pollock tackles a long-standing and fraught debate over racial inequalities in America's schools. Which denials of opportunity experienced by students of color should be remedied? Pollock exposes raw, real-time arguments over what inequalities of opportunity based on race in our schools look like today--and what, if anything, various Americans should do about it. Pollock encountered these debates while working at the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights in 1999-2001. For more than two years, she listened to hundreds of parents, advocates, educators, and federal employees talk about the educational treatment of children and youth in specific schools and districts. People debated how children were spoken to, disciplined, and ignored in both segregated and desegregated districts, and how children were afforded or denied basic resources and opportunities to learn. Pollock discusses four rebuttals that greeted demands for everyday justice for students of color inside schools and districts. She explores how debates over daily opportunity provision exposed conflicting analyses of opportunity denial and harm worth remedying. Because of Race lays bare our habits of argument and offers concrete suggestions for arguing more successfully toward equal opportunity.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
LC212.2 .P65 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001951656

Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-271) and index.

Introduction -- Rebuttal 1: harms to children of color cannot be proved -- Rebuttal 2: harms to children of color should not be discussed -- Rebuttal 3: harms to children of color cannot be remedied -- Rebuttal 4: harms to children of color are too "small" to fix -- Conclusion: arguing toward everyday justice in the new civil rights era.

In because of Race, Mica Pollock tackles a long-standing and fraught debate over racial inequalities in America's schools. Which denials of opportunity experienced by students of color should be remedied? Pollock exposes raw, real-time arguments over what inequalities of opportunity based on race in our schools look like today--and what, if anything, various Americans should do about it. Pollock encountered these debates while working at the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights in 1999-2001. For more than two years, she listened to hundreds of parents, advocates, educators, and federal employees talk about the educational treatment of children and youth in specific schools and districts. People debated how children were spoken to, disciplined, and ignored in both segregated and desegregated districts, and how children were afforded or denied basic resources and opportunities to learn. Pollock discusses four rebuttals that greeted demands for everyday justice for students of color inside schools and districts. She explores how debates over daily opportunity provision exposed conflicting analyses of opportunity denial and harm worth remedying. Because of Race lays bare our habits of argument and offers concrete suggestions for arguing more successfully toward equal opportunity.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pollock (Harvard Graduate School of Education) analyzes her two years of work with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) investigating cases of discrimination in education and relates this experience to broader debates about equal education for students of color. Pollock draws on legal documents and historical, social, and educational perspectives to explore particular OCR cases in four chapters. Chapter titles reflect the four major "rebuttals" to providing children of color with equal education that she encountered with coworkers, as well as teachers, administrators, and lawyers involved in cases of educational inequity. Pollock recommends that civil rights policies pertaining to students of color integrate the specificity of those documents outlining regulations for students with disabilities, English-language learners, and women, thereby providing grounds for creating and implementing concrete reforms for the "everyday" injustices experienced by students of color in US schools. Deborah Meier and George Wood's Many Children Left Behind (2004) and Michelle Fine et al.'s Echoes of Brown (2004) provide additional resources about racial inequity, including policy and individual research responses to inequity, respectively. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections. C. L. Lalonde D'Youville College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mica Pollock is an associate professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is the author of Colormute: Race Talk Dilemmas in an American School (Princeton) and the editor of Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School (New Press).

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