Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Spenser's allegory of love : social vision in Books III, IV, and V of The faerie queene / James W. Broaddus.

By: Broaddus, James W, 1928-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Madison [N.J.] : London ; Cranbury, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; Associated University Presses, c1995Description: 185 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0838636322 (alk. paper); 9780838636329 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Spenser, Edmund, 1552?-1599. Faerie queene | Spenser, Edmund, 1552?-1599 -- Political and social views | Literature and society -- England -- History -- 16th century | Epic poetry, English -- History and criticism | Social ethics in literature | Human body in literature | Love in literature | Sex in literature | Galen -- Influence | AllegoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Spenser's allegory of love.DDC classification: 821/.3 Also issued online.
Contents:
Britomart's initiation - Florimell's quest for the love of Marinell - Scudamour's quest for the love of Amoret - Timias's quest for the love of Belphoebe - Social concord in miniature - Toward Mercilla's castle.
Review: "Spenser's Allegory of Love approaches the major characters in Books III, IV, and V of The Faerie Queene as fictional personages who function psychically according to Renaissance sexual psychology and physically according to Renaissance sexual physiology. This approach enables readings of the quests in their own peculiar, allegorical way as imitations of actions. For each of the questers - Britomart, Florimell, Scudamour, and Timias - union with a loved one is the goal; and that goal is achieved, however problematically, in each of the quests. When the interwoven quests, which begin in Book III, continue through Book IV, and, with Britomart's quest, into Book V, are separated out and explicated, these three books of Spenser's Faerie Queene can be read so as to constitute a social vision."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR2358 .B73 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001958974

Includes bibliographical references (p. 174-178) and index.

Also issued online.

"Spenser's Allegory of Love approaches the major characters in Books III, IV, and V of The Faerie Queene as fictional personages who function psychically according to Renaissance sexual psychology and physically according to Renaissance sexual physiology. This approach enables readings of the quests in their own peculiar, allegorical way as imitations of actions. For each of the questers - Britomart, Florimell, Scudamour, and Timias - union with a loved one is the goal; and that goal is achieved, however problematically, in each of the quests. When the interwoven quests, which begin in Book III, continue through Book IV, and, with Britomart's quest, into Book V, are separated out and explicated, these three books of Spenser's Faerie Queene can be read so as to constitute a social vision."--BOOK JACKET.

Britomart's initiation - Florimell's quest for the love of Marinell - Scudamour's quest for the love of Amoret - Timias's quest for the love of Belphoebe - Social concord in miniature - Toward Mercilla's castle.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Broaddus (Indiana State Univ.) offers a perceptive and challenging treatment of Spenser's social vision. Although earlier scholars (e.g., H. Clement Notcutt, Leicester Bradner, and Kathleen Williams) treated books III-V as a unit, they did not suggest an integrated vision for reading the books. Broaddus does, using a Renaissance psychophysiological approach. He follows heroes and heroines more as fictional personages/selves than as types or personifications and is guided by the science Spenser and his contemporaries used. Careful explication of the quests as "continued allegory" reveals a comprehensive social vision when the three books are read together. At the heart of Spenser's vision are energy and order: love is the energy that moves characters on their quests. This physiology of love has been minimized by modern Neoplatonic bias and misconstrued by Sheila Cavanagh's identification of misogyny and subversion of women (Wanton Eyes and Chaste Desires, CH, Mar'95). In fact, Spenser accounts for, promotes, celebrates energies of life; his unique view: they are more vigorous and vital when properly disciplined. The solution to problems of love is not suppression of real energy deriving from inordinate passion but creation of real energy necessary for heroic deeds by properly subordinating passion. Highly recommended for all collections. L. M. Tenbusch; emerita, Immaculata College

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.